Coinbase – Buy & Sell Bitcoin, Ethereum, and more with trust

Dwolla problem

Is there any other bitcoin exchange that accepts dwolla without a fee? I'm having trouble finding one now that I can't use mtgox.
submitted by night_crawlers to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My collection of amazing early Bitcoin comments, right here from Reddit:

On buying (or not) a gaming rig to mine Bitcoin:
With the difficulty skyrocketing and exchange rates sitting stagnant at $5~8 for the last week or so, you pretty much missed the boat to buy dedicated mining hardware, IMHO. If you already have the hardware, or are looking for an excuse to buy a couple bitchin' new graphics cards for a gaming rig, there's definitely money to be made mining when you're not using it.
But I don't think I'd drop $1k into a rig that's only to mine with unless it was $1k I'd blow on something even more retarded. I certainly wouldn't sink next month's rent into it.
https://reddit.com/AskReddit/comments/hnp7f/_/c1wuv1b/?context=1
On easily cashing out Bitcoin using mtgox:
I think getting money is not that difficult. The daily volume on mtgox is over $100K, so I think anyone can currently sell Bitcoins for USD without problems.
https://reddit.com/AskReddit/comments/hnp7f/_/c1wuhjh/?context=1
On it being $10:
Is Bitcoin 10 usd yet?
https://reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hpq6c/is_bitcoin_10_usd_yet/
Bonus: Snapshot of the isbitcoin10usdyet website from 2011: https://web.archive.org/web/20110606125320/http://www.isbitcoin10usdyet.com/
Mtgox might disappear:
400K bitcoins is $4M dollars. Given all risks and uncertainties around bitcoins, no wonder some of the early founders exit their investments. Tomorrow mtgox or dwolla may disappear. It is the matter of one government intervention.
https://reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hq1wj/_/c1xgesq/?context=1
Bitcoin is terrible at friendly front-end:
This is a dangerous point-of-view. The entire bitcoin ecosystem is ugly, confusing, and deeply unusable. Really think about the questions posed in the article. The client works, as in, it creates a functional front-end for some bitcoin-related tasks, but it isn't at all designed for how humans would want to interact with the currency. The point of the article isn't that the client is hard, it's that the client works pretty well for obsessive nerds (present company included), but if bitcoin is really going to succeed at the goals it sets out to accomplish, it needs to not only be usable by normal people, it needs to be exceptional. If you think it's reasonably usable, you're welcome to that opinion, but please understand that you're the exact sort of person Mr. Falkvinge was referring to. Great with complex logic, terrible at friendly front-end.
https://reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hrqpm/_/c1xtfuy/?context=1
On wallets going out of sync:
One thing that I think is lacking is the ability to functionally use wallets on different machines as they will tend to get out of sync. This might be able to be overcome if new addresses were deterministically created from a seed contained in the wallet, but there are probably better ways.
Also, the UI for the official client is kind of a bone.
https://reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hrqpm/_/c1y730k/?context=1
On Bitcoin’s ease of use:
In fact, BTC is in such an infant state right now only enthusiasts investors, and geeks who can actually grasp how the system truly works, are using it for real.
The usability issues raised by the article are real. No grandma, or any well respected enterprise for that matter, would accept working with this type of GUI. If anything, a REAL enterprise backend still needs to be developed to handle the BTC's ungly guts, with all transactions details, hashes, mining, wallets, proxy connections, peer discovery via IRC channels... I mean... this is all too RAW for the end user. I can see a near future where startups will begin to offer user friendly GUIs, online access, maybe even online banking for your bitcoin accounts, automated backups and safety mechanisms to protect your coins in case of theft.
All of us geeks will end up supporting the bootstrap of this network so that, later on, your grandma will be able to use this just as she would use a credit card today.
https://reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hrqpm/_/c1xungz/?context=1
rBitcoin is not a sub for memes:
This isnt a subreddit for memes. Take it back to pics
https://reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/i7z0v/_/c21m3ld/?context=1
I think I’ll keep my money elsewhere:
This further reinforces BC's image as nothing more than a Ponzi scheme. When the distribution is skewed that heavily towards early adopters, they will have almost total control over the market. Those 32 could manipulate to their hearts content. I think I'll keep my money elsewhere....
https://reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/ifl26/_/c23e3ei/?context=1
Tulip mania:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulip_mania
https://www.reddit.com/AskReddit/comments/hnp7f/i_just_invested_half_of_my_next_months_rent_in/c1wuhkt/
submitted by wisequote to btc [link] [comments]

Issuing money by global central banks is a great opportunity for stablecoins," says Digital Gold Advisor Dr. Walter Tonetto

Issuing money by global central banks is a great opportunity for stablecoins,
Last week we talked with our adviser and CEO at Nusantara Trust Dr Walter Tonetto. He answered a number of questions that interest our customers.
How did you land in the cryptocurrency / blockchain space?
I was advising startup businesses in the technology space, and when 2016 came around, I asked Scotty, the feisty chief engineer of the U.S.S. Enterprise, to beam me into the heart of the finance system; I felt more and more the irresistible tug towards remodeling the current toxic financial system. Purposive remodeling, of course, is going on all the time, and it’s a knife that cuts into two directions. The vast majority of the ‘woke’ crowd actually believe that they can ‘disrupt’ the power of the elites that control all money flows. Bathing limestone statues – registering about 4 on the Mohs scale and 0 on the scale of reason -- of past leaders in district waters may give you a feeling of breathing the air of revolution and tiring unknown muscle-groups in your shanks, but think of it like a father watching his child toss around shovels of soil in a sandbox; he smiles benignly from afar, knowing it won’t change a thing; all the luxurious appointments at home won’t get touched. It is a grave illusion to suppose that by playing around with payment systems and technologies we will actually change the role and the emission of money. You may be permitted to become the shoe-shine boy in the royal household, but don’t think you will marry the princess and dilute the royal blood! But understanding the constitutive parts of power aggregation, and working over significant time-frames, allows for approaches and solutions; -- but these should come not from another adversarial position, thus merely marking a displacement of the incumbent, a change of guard, but from an authentic re-orientation, of making benefits much more widely possible and not creating monetary systems that are grossly imbalanced and highly destructive. That, and not building tech stacks, is the challenge!
What was your initial reaction to bitcoin?
Well, I was following the file-sharing service Napster since it started, around 1999 – when the U.S.S. Enterprise was sitting pier-side at Huntington Ingalls Newport shipyard, rusted and gutted, and to me the P2P sharing paradigm was always present in my mind, shining buffed and radiant, so even the centralized Napster was something wholly natural to me – Dr Sheldrake calls it morphic resonance. We live with a great deal of blurriness, though. On the one hand, we think of the virtues of sharing; on the other, there is a seemingly indefatigable impulse to control and dominate. Sean Parker, after founding and floundering with Napster, became a cocaine-snorting egotist and president of Facebook. Collecting money for a charity, he gets aggressive with people who do not follow suit. A control-freak in overdrive. Notwithstanding the technical variations, BTC, seemingly freeing us up from fiscal controls and yet showing our craving for money, exemplifies the flawed perception at the root of things. Monero, which sounds like a much faster, highoctane vehicle, a CV8-Z of the crypto-track, beats BTC in regard to privacy and fungibility, though BTC has advantages in other areas.
Which is a much more common trend nowadays?
It’s hard to make out the shapes of wild-life in the current kangaroo market we’re in. The bulls and bears have mauled one another, and the kangaroo, bereft of oxygen on account of wearing a tight mask, is hopping wildly everywhere. But clearly the possibilities of digital currencies became un-tethered via Bitcoin and the querulous and hidden Satoshi. I like to think of him more as an idea rather than as a person; an idea is generally more malleable and consequential. For instance, rather than laud the benefits of crypto for FX and cross-border payments, the possibilities of a central-bank issued digital currencyENCOMPASS THE POTENTIAL to inscribe new roles for programmable money; for how money is issued, how it is used, and what role custodial mechanisms (traditionally in the hand of commercial banks) might have. I see HUGE potential for private firms to enter the equation here, but we need more open-minded and intelligent regulators that do not always look for the rungs of the career-ladder in any move they make! A DAO could be most helpful here, but we are currently under the terror of algorithms that are not concerned with the welfare of the greatest number of people. If I had the time I would coauthor a book on this theme with a skilful mathematician (perhaps with my son, who is completing a Ph.D in near-term Quantum Algorithms).

In 2018 I was keynote speaker at the BlueWhale forum in Seoul, and I spoke about an Algorithm of Peace. I had a clutch of people approach me straight after the talk, some from Korea, others from the U.S., and ask me to develop my ideas in book form.
Where do you see the price of bitcoin going over the next few years?
I wouldn’t speculate, but since everyone is shilling it, it is bound to keep pushing north, occasional blockages otwithstanding. I always look for twists and incongruities in the usual narratives on offer. Many BTC fans talk about the unbanked, but BTC is held by what will become another elite in due course, and the unbanked will later be serving them the chilled drinks between innings, as usual.
Do you think that there’s a time for altcoins to break out and move away from the movements of bitcoin? What’s that tipping point that needs to take place?
I have some notions under which alt-coins can take the lead and leave bitcoin behind, but it’s too complex to explain the conditions for that to occur. Once very solid use-cases have been established with a clutch of alt-coins, bitcoin might begin quavering in his boots. That alt-coins should take BTC as a benchmark speaks volumes about the lack of maturity of this young and over-eager market. The fuzzy umbilical cord is always present like a foot-tangle; alt-coins must find their own ground, and clip the connection to a vagrant father. Finance needs clarity and not fuzziness. Keep in mind that many sovereign nations bridle at the calamitous influence of the US on payment systems, so nations are building their own messaging systems outside SWIFT, and their own securities exchanges are following. But remember: these are all crumbs: the U.S. can shut down payments to any recipient accounts by informing the payments company and doling out threats. And since all alt-coins and fiat currencies are connected to payment gateways in some form, the U.S. would have to begin reforming its archaic ACH structure to enable efficiencies in the financial pipes, which does not offer real-time payments functionality. This accounts for the relative simplicity (and success) of the PayPal business model (which Venmo and Dwolla later emulated without using credit cards). But understand that the elites will always protect the real crown jewels, and incite wars (or street battles and racial squabbles, as we’re witnessing in the U.S. in mid 2020) so that they can get away with major financial heists in broad daylight. It’s all smoke and mirrors, and scorched talons if you look closely: you cannot trust the reflection you will receive on a smoky pane. Only the big players know the predetermined outcome.
One fundamental misprision occurs amongst alt-coin apologetes: they fail to understand how markets move and what the designated role of money is in markets. Even if you want to displace something, you first need to understand exactly what you’re dealing with, but that is rarely the case. Yes, banks are structurally and constitutionally part of the problem, but no government will dare cross swords with them: there is still too much aggregated power. Ripple and Stellar are two Blockchains that are working with, and not against, banks, and that likely makes them much better candidates for wide acceptance.
What’s one must-read book you recommend to everyone?
That depends so very much on who’s sitting opposite me! I wouldn’t push what is not naturally aligned. But I would push a couple of films urgently, as essential viewing for everyone:
“Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe” (and a sequel), which profoundly shocked me, but confirmed my suspicions. Talking about books: one gets a good sense of the kind of books I would counsel people not to touch, unless an overweening impulse bade them otherwise. For instance Steve Pinker, a favourite author of Bill Gates. Pinker in Gates’ hands explains a lot about the character of the reader, the latter of whom I consider one of the most dangerous people on the planet at the moment. If we stay with Pinker for a moment, since he’s famous and fashionable (Harvard professor with a Medusa hairdo and an effete libertarian air, who in “Better Angels of Our Nature” has affirmed that man is not innately good), we note in his presentation in regard to his ineptly titled book “Enlightenment” that he falls prey to the very flaws he chastises, the classic Münchhausen trilemma (in Jakob Fries’ phrase). Picture Baron Münchhausen pulling himself out of quicksand by his own hair! That he is beholden to neoliberal befuddlement becomes clear when two of the opening images of his talk show Vladimir Putin with a rifle andDonald Trump speaking on a podium. The classic neoliberal Harvard think-tank shows reason to be failing and drowning in pious gestures to the cognoscenti and anointed. I like to look for effective counters for specious and shallow argument: for instance, Rupert Sheldrake’s “The Science Delusion” is a splendid book that bucks the Dawkins’, Pinkers and other materialists of this age. You see, if one listens to Pinker with the head alone, his pedestrian epistemology might not irk, and some ideas might appear plausible enough in a desultory encounter, but if you really want to know the meaning of things, and discover how it relates to the heart, you feel betrayed and given short shrift by him. Among the platitudes he gives out in carefully parsed syllables, the movement of his forehead and eyes betray the spirit behind the façade. Yet I always look, like Yeats, for those who “had changed their throats and had the throats of birds”!
What’s the rainbow trout of the year? Nut-like flavour, the eye still gleaming, with tender, flaky flesh? There are many books I could cite for different genres. The vast majority of modern writers, for all their accomplishments, lack genius, don’t really understand the art of writing, and so cannot hold my attention for long. For those who are open-minded and spiritual, “A Course in Miracles” cannot be bested, but don’t touch it unless you’re really willing to dive deep. There is no need to save the world, since it is nothing but projection; there is no world. You might experience the deepest sigh of relief, as if Atlas had cast off a burden after the Titanomachy. Paul Celan once remarked that “reality is not simply there, it must be sought for and won.” Snorkeling near the surface and blowing bubbles won’t cut it.
We are living in times of great manufactured unrest, which will only heighten in coming months and years, and so I would offer a guernsey to Seamus Heaney. I had met him many years ago, alas cursorily, at a symposium at Waseda University where I was working as a Gaikokujinkoshi, an Associate Professor, where another Nobel laureate, Kenzaburō Ōe and he were giving a reading. Heaney was inspired to write “The Grauballe Man” on the basis of the bog man that he had seen in a book of prehistoric times, but the troubles in Ulster were alive in him, too:
As if he had been poured in tar, he lies on a pillow of turf and seems to weep
the black river of himself. The grain of his wrists is like bog oak, the ball of his heel
like a basalt egg. His instep has shrunk cold as a swan’s foot or a wet swamp root.
Talking of Japan here, methinks, is an aculeate observation of Japan:
Cross the intersection at Shibuya Station in Tokyo on a forbidding wintry evening — touted as the world’s busiest cloverleaf — and you will feel this is Eliot’s London Bridge revisited, with quaggas (think half zebras) preserved in the tar of the five crossings; — flattened ebon bones dreaming the dreams of Pleistocene mammoths — as the mass of the dead mill past you, chasing some mirage, and often accompanied by a revenant that must have been disgorged from a Pachinko parlour. Blanched lilacs float in minarets of light beyond these bituminous quaggas, bidding the odd-toed ungulates in their psychotropic dernier cri and fuddy-duddies in theirstygian suits to sup here or buy over yonder: all tethered to their devices. One might be surprised that no cracks are forming at these arced crossings with strange requisitions folding into the hiemal air. And yet it is still more odd that so few people see this as a primped and pimped potter’s field, a graveyard for those who’ve lost their way. We’re living in an age where the multitude of the dead are pacing among us in perdurable trysts with other zombies.
The above text is from one of my unpublished works; again it speaks to me – and perhaps to you – about the quiddities of this age. There is a distinct sense of zombification taking place on the planet at the moment. Is your lineage that of Dolly, or are you magnificent and free?
Do you have any theories about who Satoshi is?
I don’t really, though I follow the haughty chit-chat at times, especially in the jejune forums LinkedIN provides. I think the person has a good reason to remain concealed (forever), but that is also a major factor why I have never fully trusted bitcoin as an investment proposition.
Keeping the provenance concealed suggests a number of things, none of them conducive to embracing bitcoin as a common form of payment.
What do you think about the prospects of gold in connection with the uncontrolled money printing by different Central Banks?
Gold is what BTC can never become, especially when its provenance remains totally unclear – as well as its likely endgame! Central Banks engage in quasi-criminal activity – and one hopes the future prudent regulator won’t be making it too difficult for people to hold gold bullion. The Perth Mint might be a splendid little dot on the global map, but beware of holding your assets in the form of gold coins: many governments will regard them as forms of payment, and may impose all manner of restrictions on the possession of it.
Let's dream a little. How stablecoins can be used after 5 years from now?
I believe the great RESET is coming – even Davos and the U.N. are alerting us to that. The Covid19 panic has been declared by more than 1500 German physicians as a “global Mafia-style deception”, and while Big Pharma and Bill Gates will likely earn trillions of dollars by the useless and potentially dangerous vaccines that will be foisted on “free” citizens, the finance system as a whole will need to be RESET. We are already receiving an inkling of how draconian and void of reason and concern for the people most governments of the world are reacting to a harmless lab-manufactured virus (virologist Prof Luc Montagnier, Nobel Laureate in medicine in 2008, said that), so it’s possible that regulators may become more tyrannical, and under some pretext or other forbid the use of alt-coins. STABLECOINS can be over-collateralized, allowing absorption of pricing fluctuations, but it will be hard to call. I believe many are bound to fail, and that even earlier, despite all their most valiant efforts: as soon as the RESET comes, which is likely to come with all manner of encumbrances. There are many reasons for the issuance of stablecoins, some having opposing views, but all are dependent on trust – and we don’tknow yet if digital currencies that governments will issue will by regulatory over-reach (including absurd compliance requirements) displace other contenders, but you can assume that the tyrannical forms of governance we are currently experiencing suggest that all kinds of skullduggery are possible.
Do you see the problem of fiat stablecoins in the fact that annual inflation constantly depreciates them? An investor who bought $1000 USDT now and sold these tokens in 10 years for $ 1000 will receive much less money.
The problem occurs if we’re converting things back into payment forms that are fundamentally flawed. Inflation and Black Swan events are the major threats to stablecoins, and tethered crypto-values to natively burdened propositions recalls my earlier idea that we have not yet cut the umbilical cord to bitcoin. On the other hand, stablecoins in their current flavour are perhaps best viewed as transitional schemata that will need later revisitation.
You are a very successful Crypto and ICO Advisor, what is the secret behind this success?
I’m not sure if I’m very successful, but I always try to shoot a straight ball. Here are two instances where my input has not been heeded in any way.
I recall one of the first ICOs I advised. I was sitting with the owner on a Telegram Channel, and after some power Q&A sessions online, we were literally hearing the millions of dollars tumble in neat digital hashes into the inbox within a couple of hours of the ICO opening. He had a bottle of Scotch on his table, and by the end of the session he had reached his hard cap and was besotted to boot! The age of digital money had placed the foolscap on his pate, but the script was no longer legible. I cannot determine if his sobriety ever returned. The prudential advice I had been giving him previously – and that we had discussed in great depth -- was over coming weeks thrown out of the window, and I assume other bottles of Scotch ended up on his desk and didn’t last long.
Here is another example. At one time a well-known ambitious individual in the U.S. cryptospace, a young lawyer, asked me if I wanted to start a crypto compliance organisation with him.
When I think of him now and the feathery assistants he congregated around him, I think of the lines in Dickens’s “Bleak House”: “Mr. Tangle’s learned friends, each armed with a little summary of eighteen hundred sheets, bob up like eighteen hammers in a pianoforte, make eighteen bows, and drop into their eighteen places of obscurity.”
Simply to continue serving wine from the same sour vats won’t do. I saw that as a prospective idea, and offered some important advice to get the ball rolling. Soon we had recruited many eager beavers to the exercise, and there was talk of it becoming an influential body. I was naïve enough to assume at the time that my co-founder, a black college asketballer with body tattoos who had a write-up in a major paper on account of his ambition and aggression, was actually interested in asking some fundamental revisionary questions about compliance in relation to the freedom of the citizen. When I suggested we don’t just copy the traditional compliance template and rather probe more deeply, he became insolent and very aggressive. That confirmed my instinct that most ambitious players in the crypto-space are actually dyed-in-the-wool bourgeois, and don’t care about improving the system itself.
What is your advice for upcoming Crypto startups and investors?
You might know the technology well, but do you know the business? Does it really deeply address, even solve, a problem? How much life experience do you have, and how well do you know the market? Can you create a market for your product or services? If yes, how will you do that? Have you only got yes-men around you, or are you willing to listen to those who speak Tacheles to you? If you’ve come to water the plant of your ego, your business will flounder. Most achievers keep their ego initially in check, and get the work done.
For investors the answer I would give is rather complex, but here’s a brief response: often the mandate of investors is very narrowly girded, and they trust their old boy networks, and rarely venture out and follow their instincts. That is foolish, and also the recipe for a dull life.
Perhaps a general observation that everybody might ponder with profit is the idea that we know really so very little of the world; that the news and information we are are offered and digest, even when it is tendered by so-called ‘experts’, is often seriously ignorant. It seems our perspective is getting narrower all the time, as if our mind is shrinking and we block out knowledge.
Let me give another current reference point. In 2020 everyone is fearful of viruses. Viruses currently have a bad rap! We have no idea what they actually are. We are always hobbling around with our fearful partisan gaze, and what is good today becomes bad tomorrow. Yet viruses are adroit and malleable messengers of inter-species DNA, in some sense regulating vast populations of organisms. Think of them as cellular simpletons: mere protein shells with few genes, but endowed with the ability to replicate easily despite their paucity of genetic instructions! They form alliances, you might say, with other forms of life. And they are deeply mysterious to our acquisitive and ignorant segmenting intelligence: how can the papillomavirus cause horns to grow on rabbits; and at the same time cause hundreds of thousands of cases of cervical cancer every year? Is one good and the other bad? It would seem so. Such simple summary, like Pinker’s reductionist view of the world, might becalm for a moment, but does not offer lasting satisfactions. To read the world along the axes of like and dislike, as the Buddha had warned us, leads to great suffering.
I’m told by someone who met Bill Gates a long time ago that the man was apparently even then obsessively fearful of viruses (imagine a pendant to Lady Macbeth, continually cleansing his hands). But do we have any clue what viruses actually are, and how they benefit us all in so many incalculable ways? When the child crawls around, it picks up antigens (bacteria and viruses) and on that basis builds its immune system. At various points of that contact and exchange new forms grow, and other forms decay and die. Like CO2, viruses are suddenly declared dangerous and that we need to shield ourselves against them. Yet how many people know that marine phages rule the world, and rule the sea? This was not discovered until 1986. An electron microscope showed that every litre of seawater contained up to one hundred billion viruses, almost as much in dollars as BillGates expects to make off vaccines in 2020. If you put these viruses end to end, they would stretch out forty-two million light-years! Viruses offer stunning genetic variety, and they are the very pulse of life! When viruses swallow oceanic microbes, they release a billion tons of carbon every day: imagine squalls of marine snowfalls, powdering the porous sand of the deep. Imagine the white nights of St Petersburg under water, celebrating the magic of life with the same skill and abandon as the Mariinsky Theatre, to an audience of gastropods, deep-water fish and lovelorn mermaids.
Seamus Heaney, when he passed in 2013, spoke the word Noli timere (“Do not fear”) to his wife as he breathed his last. Instead of being fearful, we might do well to assert that we understand nothing of the manifold wonders of this world! Let us cultivate the virtue of wonderment, and fear will find no habitation in our house:
And lonely as it is that loneliness Will be more lonely ere it will be less— A blanker whiteness of benighted snow With no expression, nothing to express.
They cannot scare me with their empty spaces Between stars—on stars where no human race is. I have it in me so much nearer home To scare myself with my own desert places.
Website : https://gold.storage/ Whitepaper: https://gold.storage/wp.pdf
Follow us on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/gold_erc20 Telegram: https://t.me/digitalgoldcoin Steemit: https://steemit.com/@digitalgoldcoin Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/golderc20/ Bitcointalk: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5161544
submitted by digitalgoldcoin to golderc20 [link] [comments]

With 244 million active accounts in 2018, PayPal is one of the most popular payment processing tools out there. PayPal has lots of limitations that slow down the process of running the business and high fees. Here's a list of PayPal Alternatives for Startups

PayPal is a well-known solution for companies looking to accept payments worldwide, manage their finances, and send invoices. With 244 million active accounts in 2018, PayPal is one of the most popular payment processing tools out there.
More and more companies are looking for PayPal alternatives these days since this company has lots of limitations that slow down the process of running the business.
When it comes to choosing the proper payment solution, you need to pay attention to the fees, data security, and customer service.
For those of you who are looking for Paypal replacements or want to know other flexible solutions, in this list, we have put together 32 great Paypal alternatives that work for startups.
Source

Payoneer

Payoneer is the first option that crosses my mind when it comes to Paypal alternatives. Payoneer allows you to send money using a debit card, credit card, and ACH payments. It is fast, – the payments can be completed in just 2 hours.
Pricing: Processing fee starts at 3%

Skrill

Skrill has a clean, user-friendly interface. It offers you a prepaid debit card. The fees may be the same as Paypal, but it makes international payments easier since the payments can be sent to the debit card at once. After that, you can use your debit card to withdraw money using an ATM.
Pricing: Receiving money into your Skrill account is free. Send payment for only 1.45% fee. Withdraw funds with 7.50 % fee.

TransferWise

Transferwise is a much faster and cheaper solution for international transfers. You can send and receive money on their service without borders. It merely works: clients pay in their currency, and you get the payment right on your bank account within a few hours in the currency of your country. You need to share your phone number and last four digits of your credit card to receive money.
Pricing: You need to pay a difference in exchange rates and small Transferwise fee.

Selz

Selz is a tool that will help you to create your online store or sell goods on social media. It is not a payment system, but an online store builder with ‘drag and drop’ feature and more. Besides that, you can integrate your payment gateway with Selz without other external services. They offer automatic Tax Invoices for your customers.
Pricing: 2% transaction fee; 2.9% + 30¢ processing fee¹

Google Pay

Using Google Pay, your clients can make purchases using your website and app. You can enable shopping across devices to reduce missed conversions and forgotten passwords. This is one of the best options for store owners. It takes a second to get or receive a payment.
Pricing: Google Pay has no fees for using debit cards or making bank transfers, though you have to pay a 2.9% fee for credit cards.

2checkout

2checkout is another perfect Paypal alternative tool. It’s all about accepting payments globally. The commission in the USA is almost the same as Paypal, but when it comes to receiving payment from other countries, they offer better rates. It allows you to sell any product abroad.
Pricing: 2SUBSCRIBE pricing plan requires 4.5% + $0.45 per successful sale. 2SELL requires 3.5% + $0.35 per successful sale.

Stripe

Stripe is a global startup company with a 19% market share. Companies of any type and size use the service to accept payments and manage their business needs. Developers love this service for Stripe’s API that allows quickly add a payment method to a website.
Pricing: 2.9% + 30¢ per successful card charge

Wepay

Wepay features not only excellent customer support but also a virtual terminal that allows you to make purchases online without leaving the website. The company was established in 2008.
Pricing: 2.9 percent + $0.30 per credit card payment; 1 percent + $0.30 per bank transfer.

Quickbooks

Quickbooks or Intuit is a popular useful tool for small business owners who need help with their finances. It gives you an ability to accept payments both in-person and online. Besides, it can help you to pay taxes, manage salaries, and file payroll tax forms.
Pricing: 2.4 percent + $0.25 per swiped, tapped or dipped transaction; 3.4 percent + $0.25 per keyed transaction

ProPay

ProPay was built in 1997. It provides similar features as PayPal, along with the ability to send and receive payments worldwide. For those who are doing transactions in person, you can use ProPay JAK. It is a mobile phone credit card reader that process cards in real time.
Pricing: Pricing depends on the type of transaction and card you have.

Shopify Payments

For those of you who sell products and services with Shopify, you need to get a closer look at their in-built service called Shopify Payments. It gives you low processing fees, allows you to accept payments using different cards (Visa, Discover, Mastercard, and American Express), and have all your data at one place.
Pricing: Online credit card rates 2.9% + 30¢. In-person credit card rates 2.7% + 0¢.

Amazon Pay

Amazon Pay if the first tool for letting people checkout at your online store. It features an account with user login where all information is stored. It makes the process faster and smoother than with regular shopping cart.
Pricing: The fees start with 2.9 percent+ 30¢ per transaction

Dwolla

Dwolla is another tool similar to Paypal. Just like Paypal, it allows you to send and receive payments from individuals and companies. Their main specialization is ACH bank transfers, so that bank transfers are super secure. But the main disadvantage is that you can’t create an account with Dwolla outside of the US.
Pricing: The transaction fee is only $0.25.

Braintree

This tool will come in handy for e-commerce store owners because it offers web and mobile payments. You can store credit cards with Braintree just like Google Pay. Paypal runs this company, but it still provides more advanced list of features and better customer support.
Pricing: 2.9% + $.30 per transaction.

Square

This tool will help you to manage payrolls. With Square, your employees can clock in and out of work and set up direct deposits. Besides, Square grants small business loans that you can pay back with a percentage of daily sales.
Pricing: 2.9 percent fee + $0.30 per transaction

Payza

With Payza you can accept payments using a credit card and bank account. Moreover, the tool also works with cryptocurrency.
Pricing: 1.99 percent + $0.25 per transaction

Venmo

Venmo is famous for its feature to send cash to friends. When you create an account on Venmo, it offers you to make a list of friends. After that, it is way easier to send money to people from this list. The business can use it for the checkout process.
Pricing: It’s free to send or receive money from a linked bank account. Electronic withdrawal (standard or Instant) from $0 or 1%* (min. $0.25). $2.50 for out-of-network ATM withdraw.

Payline

Payline offers you straightforward, transparent, and flexible payment processing experience. It is a useful service for store owners – you can use it whether you’re in-store, mobile, or online.
Pricing: Swiping in person: 0.2% ($0.10 per transaction | $10 per month)

click2sell

Click2sell is a reliable Paypal alternative that offers almost all the same features. It accepts Paypal, Skrill, and credit card payments. The main difference is that they have potent reports and affiliate tracking.
Pricing: Depending on your plan, $1.50 + 7 percent per direct sale or $1 per transaction up to $19.99

Klarna

Klarna is a service that offers its customers ‘pay later’ feature. It means you can purchase goods online and pay with Klarna. Then, you have from 14 up to 30 days after delivery to pay them back interest-free.
Pricing: Free for up to one month

Merchant

Merchant claim to be a hassle-free payment processing company that gives you more control over your funds than Paypal. They allow a grace period that can help you to resolve disputes rather than freeze your account, just like Paypal usually does.
Pricing: Processing fees start at 1.99 percent + $0.25 per transaction

Wirecard

Another perfect payment solution for global companies. Wirecard works with over 100 transaction currencies and 200 payment networks that gives you almost complete freedom. With this tool, you can do in-store payments, mobile payments, value-added services, and much more.
Pricing: The pricing is available upon request

BlueSnap

BlueSnap allows you to add payment methods to your websites, stores, and apps. Your customers can make purchases with credit cards, bank accounts, or similar online payment systems.
Pricing: 3.90% + $0.30 or you can develop a personal pricing plan.

Worldpay

Whether you use terminal, online, or point-of-sale with Worldpay, it does not matter. They provide EMV chip card payments and also alternative payment options in the situations when your customer has no card.
Pricing: Pricing is available upon request

FastSpring

FastSpring is an e-commerce platform for software and Saas companies. With this service, you can easily enable payments online or in an app. You can make popup checkout for clients, personalized shopping experience and more.
Pricing: Pricing is available upon request

Viewpost

Viewpost is a full-featured payment and billing solution that will be suitable for both single freelancer and huge enterprise company. You can view payment history in your account and keep track of all transactions.
Pricing: $14.99/month plus transaction fees

Authorize

Authorize has over 43,000 merchants and handles more than one billion transactions per year. This is a big company that accepts credit card and electronic payments in person, or over the phone.
Pricing: No setup fee, free monthly gateway, 2.9% + 0.30 cents per transaction

Popmoney

Send, receive or request money online with Popmoney. The process is transparent and straightforward: cash moves from one bank account to another without any middle accounts.
Pricing: Flat $0.95 per transaction to use it here at Popmoney.com

Charge

Without setup or cancellation fees, Charge is a good credit card processing platform. It enables you to accept payments online and in stores.
Pricing: Merchant Account Application Fee and Web Shopping Cart are free.

Paylane

If you have SaaS or e-commerce businesses, you need to take a closer look at Paylane. This tool allows you to accept payments in various currencies and formats. Smashing Magazine and The Next Web use it.
Pricing: 2.8% + 0.25 EUR and 0 for Paypal

Coinbase

Coinbase is a cryptocurrency trading platform that allows the business to get Bitcoin transfers. If your client is familiar with cryptocurrency, they can easily send your payment to your Bitcoin wallet. Then, you can merely convert this amount into your local currency, or transfer to another payment service. But remember about exchange rates.
Pricing: Pricing varies depending on the cryptocurrency

Apple Pay

All iPhone users can get the advantage of using Apple Pay to transfer money. Previously, I used it only to pay products in stores without a card. When a person sends you cash, it stores automatically in your Apple Wallet. You can spend it using Apply Pay or transfer on your bank account within 1-3 business days.
Pricing: It charges the banks as a rebate for every transaction. No fee for merchants.
submitted by sdblro to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Effective October 28, Dwolla will be withdrawing its service offerings to virtual currency exchanges and virtual currency related services.

"Dear
As you know, Dwolla does not sell, accept, mine, value, take possession of, or hold Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product, and none of Dwolla’s users transact business with Dwolla using Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product. However, recent interest involving virtual currency and its exchanges has created uncertainty and confusion around virtual currency, and Dwolla's relationship with a small number of its exchanges. This has forced Dwolla to reassign resources, funds, and services.
As Dwolla gears up for a new stage of growth, we recognize that we can no longer sustain this merchant base (.1 percent of Dwolla merchants) and its unique needs, and that attempting to do so jeopardizes both of our communities' starkly different, but similarly ambitious, vision for improving payments.
Effective October 28, 2013 at 4pm CT, Dwolla will be withdrawing its service offerings to virtual currency exchanges and virtual currency related services.
We intend to work with you in meeting your needs and satisfying obligations to your customers. Here is a timeline of events you should anticipate. Today, October 10 (1500h, Eastern Time): Only existing Dwolla users will be able to send funds to your business. October 15 (1700h, Eastern Time): Your account will be limited to sending money only. You will no longer be able to receive funds from customers. You will be able to issue refunds to customers at this time. October 28 (1700h, Eastern Time): Your account will be suspended. No further activity will be provided. October 29 (1500h, Eastern Time): You will receive a copy of your final statements in .CSV format. We will transfer any remaining funds in the Dwolla system to your linked bank account. If you have more than one bank account linked, we will use the bank account with the most recent transaction, unless you notify us otherwise. October 30 (and subsequent dates): If Dwolla receives a reversal or chargeback, we will notify you by email to the address on file. The email will provide the name of the sender and the dollar amount involved. The amount of the reversal will be debited the next business day from your linked bank account. If we fail to recover funds, we may utilize collections procedures. If you wish to receive an affidavit from the financial institution, you may request one by emailing [email protected]. Please let us know what else we can do to assist with the transition.
Sincerely, Dwolla Support "
submitted by homad to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to buy these cheap coins right now

Since we've all been goxxed now is the time to buy those $50-60 coins floating around and profit from everybody else's misery. Or you could wait for Gox to come back online and crash down the price even further but good luck trying to do any trading there to buy coins, the trading engine is already broken I don't expect the new one to work flawlessly due to epic 3yr history of GOXXING
BTC-E.com
To pay into this exchange, you need a BTC-E code, PM or Okpay. Take pics of your ID and utility bill and pay the $10 to Okpay for 'quick verification'. You can pay bitcoins directly into your Okpay account for initial funding or wait and see how long it takes for reg verification.
Now either wire money, or instant money transfer (MoneyPolo, Contact-sys, Unistream) to fund your account or find an Okpay exchanger somewhere. Or Ukash/CashU. Just because contact-sys is Russian doesn't mean there aren't sending points in every country in the world.
BTC-E codes you buy on #bitcoin-otc from verified gpg authenticated traders with good ratings, or on bitcointalk.org forums in the currency exchange forums.
Perfect Money is a shady HYIP digital currency run by Russians much like Liberty Reserve. You sign up for free, and load your account with wires (if verified) or you use an exchanger. This is what talkgold.com is for to find legit exchangers. I use wm-center.com to wire WU/Moneygram and get PM. Click on 'Interkassa' payment method in BTC-E and select Perfect Money. Instant load.
You can also obviously dump Litecoins you bought on Vircurex to fund the account, or a gagillion PPcoins
Bitfloor.com
Fastest way to deposit is through CapitalOne P2P or cash deposit https://bitfloor.com/docs/#funding-deposit
Be aware Bitfloor is insolvent due to owing 25k bitcoins that were stolen last year but they have a repayment schedule that may or may not bankrupt them. Use at own risk but most ppl trade there everyday with no problems.
Bitstamp.net
Great exchange in Slovakia? I think. You have to pay with Euro SEPA wire, then for some stupid reason they convert the money to USD. You can pay in here using transferwise.com if you're from UK, or XEtrade and other Forex online money transfer companies. Google 'free money transfer fx' and review your options. Most don't charge you anything if over a certain amount of money. They take your internet billing or other local payment, convert to EUR and send SEPA for you if you request it. If they don't then check with Bitstamp what a SWIFT wire costs (probably nothing, I think they use Latvian banks that charge no receiving fees). If you want a bank account in Latvia then sign up here: http://www.rietumu.com/ if you have a local corporation or business where you live you can, maybe a personal account too. You can always incorporate a dirt cheap Delaware LLC or Oregon LLC from anywhere in the world and use it to open up worldwide bank accounts.
Bitcoin-24.com
Takes direct wires, all sorts of other methods: https://bitcoin-24.com/fees You can also use Liqpay if you have a USD or EUR card. Sign up to liqpay.com, then they block a small verification amount you have to sign into internet banking (for the card) to check. It's usually $1.something or less. After that you are verified to load $1-100 or so, but I'd just try $50 at first. Any more than that and Liqpay will seize the funds and ask for your bank to authorize a fax they send which no bank will do because of privacy reasons, so pointless to load anymore money. Liqpay may also call you to verify card details this is normal. Liqpay is meant for Russians and CIS countries to use like Ukraine so due to epic fraud of credit cards don't expect to load too much this way unless you find a Liqpay exchanger, but what's the point when you can just wire money to bitcoin-24 anyways.
Vircurex.com
Good exchange, had some problems due to DDoS but so did all exchanges. They only accept BTC, altcoins and VouchX for payment. You buy Vouchx here: https://www.aurumxchange.com/ or from somebody on Bitcointalk, or IRC (with rep). You can buy a bunch of litecoins anywhere to fund this exchange such as the bitcointalk forums or IRC. Warning: the so-called official twitter account is fake, don't use it.
Cavirtex.com
Can only fund if in Canada, they accept cash deposit and internet billing. Price has been steady at ~$90 all day though no panic selling.
LibertyBit.com
https://www.libertybit.com/funding various easy methods, new exchange in Canada that takes intl wires and shockingly Interac deposits (easily frauded).
Bitcoin China
https://btcchina.com/ fast growing exchange, you pay in with Alipay or Tenpay both Chinese methods that westerners can't use or figure out due to no translation. You can probably use Alipay if you find and exchanger to load it, they do exist. **Edit they now support Liberty Reserve deposit and withdrawal
Check english forums to see if anybody exchanging Alipay or taking wires.
CampBX.com
Accepts money orders, and CapitalOne P2P payments. Also accepts Dwolla but you need to be verified.
Bitcoin-central.net
Just had a major outage due to instawallet hack, appears to be back online. You get your own quasi-bank account when you verify here much like how ecardone.com (liberty reserve) does banking so can transfer to other users legally with vouchers. You can buy a voucher p2p on Bitcointalk forums or IRC or send a bankwire.
VirWoX.com
You can pay with Paypal to get Second Life "Linden Dollars" then convert to BTC, or at least you used to be able to. I have no idea if this is still the case I've never used them.
Or course there's all the fixed price exchangers
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Trade and https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?board=53.0 for everything from Moneypak to Skrill. You can also risk buying coins on Silk Road with moneypak
==============R U L E S ================================
Enjoy buying all the way down the crash once Gox comes back online and the great sell off begins! Hold them for a year and they'll be worth 10x as much just like the 2011 crash. Bonus points if you speculate on Litecoin, rumor has it Gox will be trading them when they come back online but again, this is MtGox we are talking about so the site could implode on the zerg rush of people trying to get into their accounts or trading engine could sell all your coins for $0.0001 again like they did in 2011.
Great successez!
submitted by Derpcoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Battle Over Bitcoin: China Backs US Startup Coinbase And US Falls Behind In Virtual Currencies.

Indeed, virtual currencies are nothing new to the Chinese. For example, more than 100 million people on the social platform QQ have used the Q coin for more than 10 years. And after China’s state-run China Central Television, or CCTV, ran a half-hour-long documentary on bitcoins, downloads of apps for processing and “mining” bitcoins soared in the world’s second largest economy.
Bitcoin, long the plaything of the Western ubernerd, now appears poised to grow substantially in China and other markets, like the euro zone, where government meddling in native currency valuations has left many distrustful of the money in their bank accounts.
Americans don’t have this problem -- yet. And that may be a problem in itself. According to bitcoin proponents, if the U.S. tries to ignore the nascent currency, writing it off as a financial fad with less value than the seemingly stable dollar, Americans risk ceding to the Chinese and others control of the future of what could be the most disruptive force in monetary exchanges since the credit card. In turn, the dollar and the ability of the U.S. to navigate global currency conflicts could be seriously weakened.
“Here’s the bottom line: Bitcoin has much higher popularity outside the U.S. and much higher potential outside the U.S.,” observed Andreas M. Antonopoulos of the Bitcoin Foundation. “If you go to an American and say, ‘Hey, there’s this new thing, bitcoin,’ they say, ‘Well, what’s wrong with the dollar?’ That question is different in other countries.”
Bitcoins are a finite, Web-based currency created in 2009 by a group of hackers working under the nom-de-Internet Satoshi Nakamoto. Exactly 10,952,975 bitcoins are in circulation, all of which have been purchased on exchange networks or mined. The currency is mined using software that processes transactions on the bitcoin network, adding groups of transactions, called blocks, to the chain. Miners are paid about 25 bitcoins per block. That digital money can then be used to purchase a variety of goods online, from legitimate software to heroin on the infamous virtual black-market Silk Road.
Bitcoin surged in value to $266 last month, thrusting the currency into the mainstream spotlight as investment poured in from sources as diverse as the hapless Brothers Winklevoss (of Facebook infamy) and Union Capital Ventures principal Fred Wilson (an early investor in Zynga, Twitter, and Kickstarter). Suddenly, everyone was talking about buying bitcoins. But the bubble burst in late April, and in the U.S. at least, bitcoin faded from the news. That was not the case in China, where Antonopoulos said downloads of bitcoin clients have eclipsed those in the U.S.
Bitcoins are mined in several steps. After downloading a bitcoin client, such as Coinbase (which serves as a wallet in which to store the bits of code that constitute the digital money), miners often join pools where they share computing power to decode algorithms in which bitcoins are hidden. The concept of bitcoins and bitcoin mining is cryptic for many people, even some otherwise forward-thinking American investors. The irony is that, for now, American startups are leading the bitcoin charge, and the U.S. government was the first to issue guidance on using the currency as payment -- a seemingly tacit recognition of bitcoin’s validity as legal tender.
Why China Poses A Threat
Feng Li, the IDG partner who chose to fund Coinbase, said the Chinese have yearned for access to a virtual currency since the central government cracked down on the use of Q coins.
Q coins were introduced in March 2002 by Tencent Holdings Ltd. (HKG:0700), the parent company of the country’s most popular instant-messaging service, QQ , and they currently average an annual transaction value of more than 1 billion yuan ($163 million). That value is growing at about 15 to 25 percent each year.
Q coins, purchased with yuan, are predominantly used to buy virtual products and services in QQ and its related online games and social media. Originally, Tencent regulations prevented Q coins from being traded between users or converted back to yuan, but allowed users to trade points and purchase Q coins with their game accounts, then use the black market to convert them into cash. That caused concerns at the People’s Bank of China, China’s central bank. In January 2007, converting game points to Q coins was banned, and Tencent reiterated that Q coins constitute a product, not a currency, which seemed to satisfy the concerns.
“There has already been proof with the Q coin,” Feng said of the Chinese likeliness to start using bitcoin. “It’s been very well circulated and very well adopted.”
Already, shops on Taobao -- the Chinese equivalent to eBay Inc. (NASDAQ:EBAY), owned by Alibaba.com Ltd. (HKG:1688) -- accept bitcoins as payment for goods, as does the similar service, Tencent’s PaiPai.com.
The Chinese are embracing bitcoins in other ways. The first bitcoin fund began to raise money in June, with the goal of raising 20 million yuan. The fund’s investment threshold is 10,000 yuan, and it will mature in four years.
Q coin’s popularity isn’t the only reason bitcoin has appeal in China. As it turns out, China is the perfect place for bitcoin mining. While much of the developed world is well into the transition from personal computers to mobile devices, China’s PC market is still thriving, which provides the necessary computing power to run a successful business converting electricity into mined coins. Price caps on electricity already create wasteful use of energy in China, so running a code-crunching computer for hours on end isn’t as costly an investment as it would be in the U.S. And so-called “gold-mining” or “gold-farming” businesses already exist in China’s cybersphere. None of that will come as a surprise to any “World of Warcraft” player: Gamers in Chinese urban sweatshops are known to sit in front of glowing blue screens for hours, slaughtering players in the game for their spoils or mining gold deposits found in the sprawling milieu of Blizzard Entertainment’s international blockbuster. Those treasures are then sold to players in the game for real money.
China has a heavily controlled currency, which also makes bitcoin attractive.
“The more controlled the currency is, the harder the transactions are, the more friction there is in the national currency, the more appealing the coin is,” Antonopoulos said, noted that the most appealing place to use bitcoin would be a country whose economy is a veritable train wreck -- like Zimbabwe, except that the southern African nation lacks the necessary technology. “I would say China is perfect,” he said. “It’s got the penetration, it’s got the smartphones, it’s got the Internet and the people are familiar with virtual currencies. And, it’s got the not-as-appealing national currency.”
Regulation In The U.S.
Guidance issued in March by the U.S. Treasury Department said that companies issuing or exchanging online cash, including bitcoin, would be subject to the same scrutiny as traditional firms such as the Western Union Co. (NYSE:WU) to prevent money laundering.
Less than two months later, the Department of Homeland Security proved that edict had teeth.
Federal officials obtained a warrant Tuesday to seize an account tied to Mt.Gox, the Tokyo-based exchange company that handles about 80 percent of all bitcoin trades. Authorities accused Mt.Gox’s U.S. subsidiary, Mutum Sigillum LLC, of failing to register as a money-services company with the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. An account held by the online-payments firm Dwolla was subsequently seized.
Many feared the warrant execution could cast a chill over the bitcoin industry as a sector centered on a borderless, decentralized money came under the scrutiny of the federal government.
That proved not to be the case, Coinbase’s Ehrsam said. “For bitcoin to go mainstream, or as it goes mainstream, it will be used in a higher and higher amount of transactions,” he said, adding that Coinbase is registered as a money-services firm. “There’s no way there will be all this money flowing through an unregulated system.”
Chris Larsen -- the CEO of OpenCoin, a fellow San Francisco-based payment platform that processes most national currencies as well as bitcoin and its own virtual cash, Ripple -- agreed. “They definitely are regulating them, [and] we actually think that’s a really good thing for the industry,” he told IBTimes. “I thought the guidance was a good idea. One of the things the guidelines seem to make clear for the first time is that a virtual currency could be used for goods and services.”
The Price Of Regulation
But such regulation is a slippery slope, said Jerry Brito, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.
Perhaps it begins with measures to prevent money-laundering, he said. But what measures would the government take to prevent the untraceable currency from being used for child pornography or human trafficking?
“Bitcoin has the potential to be a disruptive technology that would be beneficial to the economy, and we don’t want to kill off that potential to get at the other potential for bad stuff,” he observed. Brito, who plans to speak next month at a conference on virtual currencies organized by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, added: “We’re already the first country to enforce money-laundering laws against bitcoin. But the U.S. would be shooting itself in the foot if it went too far [with regulations] and either outlawed bitcoin or made the legal guidelines impossible to comply with.”
Will China Step In?
So far, Chinese bitcoin merchants have little to fear. For many, the CCTV segment on bitcoin seemed to be a signal from Beijing, which heavily controls the channel’s content, that the currency is worth exploring.
Some of those interviewed speculated that the Communist Party wants to see bitcoin stockpiled in China, allowing the government to invest in it if, or when, the dollar is shaken from its perch as the world’s reserve currency.
It remains to be seen whether -- or, more likely, when -- China will intervene in the trade of bitcoin in its own economy. But for the U.S. to experience widespread adoption of the currency, which is considered a necessary step for gaining a grasp on the bitcoin market, limited government control will have to allow the money, like the Internet that birthed it, to develop organically.
submitted by kazzZZY to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why the Feds' seizure of Mt. Gox funds is a Good Thing

A lot of people are upset with the government for shutting down the Dwolla/Mt. Gox account. But let's stop and consider what their agenda really is, and what this means for Bitcoin.
1) The Feds shut down the Mt. Gox account because Mark Karpeles is incompetent (which, after Mt. Gox's history, shouldn't really shock anyone). He apparently answered "No" to the following questions while opening his account1:
"Do you deal in or exchange currency for your customer?"
"Does your business accept funds from customers and send the funds based on customers' instructions (Money Transmitter)?"
Obviously these are outright lies. Mark didn't follow the rules, so at least we understand why the government is seizing money. From that perspective, this is probably NOT the beginning of a federal war on Bitcoin, just on Mt. Gox.
2) Mt. Gox is the biggest weakness in the Bitcoin ecosystem. People have been saying this for over a year, and it's still true. If Bitcoin has a single, central exchange, we're defeating the purpose of a decentralized currency. Hopefully the federal inquisition into Mt. Gox will spur the growth of competing exchanges, or even a long-overdue peer-to-peer exchange system.
3) Your money is safe. That's one of the advantages of Bitcoin. As long as you're securing your Bitcoins yourself, the Feds can't touch you.
4) Powerful people own Bitcoin. If the Feds step on some toes, it actually might lead to positive regulatory change. The Winklevoss twins almost certainly have lots of lobbyist friends.
All told, I can't see anything but a stronger Bitcoin on the other side of this. We weren't willing to move away from MtGox on our own, so maybe the Feds are going to give us a little push.
1 http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/05/feds-reveal-the-search-warrant-that-seized-mt-gox-account/
submitted by Vycid to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why is it so difficult to buy BTC?

I really love the concept of bitcoin and I want to invest in it. I have thousands of dollars that I want to convert to BTC, but I'm finding it nearly impossible and extremely frustrating to get my hands on any. It is almost to point of giving up entirely.
My options: Coinbase.com. I've purchased 15, yes, FIFTEEN, whole bitcoins in the course of 2 weeks, because it takes a whole freaking week for them to transfer them, they cap it at 10 per day, and 99% of the time their capacity has been reached.
MtGox: I cannot believe that this is the #1 bitcoin exchange -- a year ago it looked and acted like it was implemented by cavemen. It was an abomination. It was hacked. And, even the name is stupid. They do not tell you what types of payments they accept unitl you sign up. The charts are offline half of the time I check.
Second of all, you have to provide them with all of your details, and a scanned government issued ID. Seriously? They had their accounts hacked a year ago and now they ask for my passport? My own investment banks do not ask for scanned ids. It is ABSURD.
Dwolla: Before I can even use MtGox, I need to set up another account that requires my entire life story.
So, let's recap what it takes to own this magical "anonymous" currency:
That's it! You're ready to buy bitcoin! Now you can order pizza!
Really, bitcoin, what the fuck? How is this ever going to take off if I, a savvy lifelong user of the internet, with ~$5k that I'm willing to invest in BTC, who already knows about it and wants it quite badly, cannot even get any? This is pathetic.
submitted by a-typical-redditor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dwolla Cuts All Ties to Bitcoin

Dear Dwolla Account Holder,
As you know, Dwolla does not sell, accept, mine, value, take possession of, or hold Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product, and none of Dwolla’s users transact business with Dwolla using Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product. However, recent interest involving virtual currency and its exchanges has created uncertainty and confusion around virtual currency, and Dwolla's relationship with a small number of its exchanges. This has forced Dwolla to reassign resources, funds, and services.
As Dwolla gears up for a new stage of growth, we recognize that we can no longer sustain this merchant base (.1 percent of Dwolla merchants) and its unique needs, and that attempting to do so jeopardizes both of our communities' starkly different, but similarly ambitious, vision for improving payments.
Effective October 28, 2013 at 4pm CT, Dwolla will be withdrawing its service offerings to virtual currency exchanges and virtual currency related services.
What does this mean? Your account, and its functionality, will remain unaffected. However, you can deactivate your account from within your Dwolla dashboard, if you so choose. Dwolla aims to provide its users and the few affected merchants with the guidance necessary to ensure a smooth transition. To do that, we encourage users to over-communicate with our support team, report any suspicious activity, and revisit our terms of service to ensure uninterrupted services. What is the timeline of events? October 10: Only existing users with a 30-day history with Dwolla will be able to send funds to merchants affected by this change. October 15: Affected merchants will be limited to sending money only, and will no longer be able to receive funds from customers. They will be able to issue refunds to customers at this time. October 28: Affected merchants’ accounts will be suspended. No further activity will be provided. October 29: Provided no security or fraud concerns, Dwolla will transfer any of the remaining funds inside the affected merchant's Dwolla account to its linked bank account. The decision to remove anyone from the network -- no matter the circumstances -- is not something Dwolla takes lightly. We are grateful for the opportunity to service and learn from these users. We wish the community and its pioneers the best.
Sincerely, Dwolla Support
submitted by alexpeterson91 to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Dwolla is cutting ties with Bitcoin merchants!

Just received the email:
Dear Dwolla Account Holder, 
As you know, Dwolla does not sell, accept, mine, value, take possession of, or hold Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product, and none of Dwolla’s users transact business with Dwolla using Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product. However, recent interest involving virtual currency and its exchanges has created uncertainty and confusion around virtual currency, and Dwolla's relationship with a small number of its exchanges. This has forced Dwolla to reassign resources, funds, and services.
As Dwolla gears up for a new stage of growth, we recognize that we can no longer sustain this merchant base (.1 percent of Dwolla merchants) and its unique needs, and that attempting to do so jeopardizes both of our communities' starkly different, but similarly ambitious, vision for improving payments.
Effective October 28, 2013 at 4pm CT, Dwolla will be withdrawing its service offerings to virtual currency exchanges and virtual currency related services.
What does this mean? Your account, and its functionality, will remain unaffected. However, you can deactivate your account from within your Dwolla dashboard, if you so choose. Dwolla aims to provide its users and the few affected merchants with the guidance necessary to ensure a smooth transition. To do that, we encourage users to over-communicate with our support team, report any suspicious activity, and revisit our terms of service to ensure uninterrupted services. What is the timeline of events? October 10: Only existing users with a 30-day history with Dwolla will be able to send funds to merchants affected by this change. October 15: Affected merchants will be limited to sending money only, and will no longer be able to receive funds from customers. They will be able to issue refunds to customers at this time. October 28: Affected merchants’ accounts will be suspended. No further activity will be provided. October 29: Provided no security or fraud concerns, Dwolla will transfer any of the remaining funds inside the affected merchant's Dwolla account to its linked bank account. The decision to remove anyone from the network -- no matter the circumstances -- is not something Dwolla takes lightly. We are grateful for the opportunity to service and learn from these users. We wish the community and its pioneers the best.
Sincerely, Dwolla Support
submitted by jrwreno to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

Seizure Warrant Against Mutum Sigillum (short preliminary legal analysis)

Mirrored from my blog (there with links working):
http://k.lenz.name/LB/?p=9369
The United States District Court in Maryland has issued a Seizure Warrant against a company called Mutum Sigillum (which seems to be Latin and mean something like "silent seal"). The Warrant authorizes to seize funds of Mutum Sigillum stored at the Dwolla account No. 812-649-1010.
Dwolla operates an online payment service that is open only to residents of the United States. See their Terms of Service, which state:
"Dwolla may only be used in connection with United States Financial Institutions: User funds must originate at a United States Financial Institution, and Dwolla will only instruct Veridian to transfer funds to a United States Financial Institution associated with the appropriate Dwolla User."
Mutum Sigillum is an American company owned by Mark Karpeles, who also owns the World's largest Bitcoin exchange Mt.Gox, located in Japan right next door to my university.
The warrant is accompanied by an affidavit (a sworn statement of facts) by a Special Agent of "Homeland Security Investigations, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement". This Affidavit is not only a statement of fact, but it also explains some legal theories behind the application for the Seizure Warrant.
The Affidavit establishes that a "Confidential Informant (CI-1)" residing and banking in Maryland was able to send some funds to himself, with Mutum Sigillum and Mt.Gox involved in the process.
In detail: CI-1 opens accounts at Dwolla and at Mt.Gox. CI-1 funds his Mt.Gox over Dwolla. CI-1 buys some Bitcoins at Mt.Gox. CI-1 sells Bitcoins on Mt.Gox, getting back to dollars at his Mt.Gox account. CI-1 directs Mt.Gox to send these dollars to his Dwolla account, where they are right now.
So, the Affidavit has shown that CI-1 was able to send these dollars to himself over this elaborate process.
But, unless I am missing something here, that is not what one could reasonable describe as "transmitting money". You would need some other party that actually receives funds for that.
This is similar to sex. You are supposed to do it with someone else involved.
The relevant American statute, 18 USC § 1960, helpfully provides a definition of "money transmitting".
"(2) the term “money transmitting” includes transferring funds on behalf of the public by any and all means including but not limited to transfers within this country or to locations abroad by wire, check, draft, facsimile, or courier;"
"Transfer funds" means getting them to someone else. The only one doing that in this case is Dwolla. Both CI-1 and Mutum Sigillum are just normal users of the money transmitting service Dwolla provides.
The recent FinCen Guidance of March 2013 makes in principle the same point:
"The term "money transmission services" means "the acceptance of currency, funds, or other value that substitutes for currency from one person and the transmission of currency, funds, or other value that substitutes for currency to another location or person by any means." (Emphasis added).
CI-1 transferred the funds to himself. No other person involved. And he transferred them from Maryland to Maryland. No other location involved.
The above analysis is just common sense. Mt.Gox is a user of money transfer services, not a provider. If they were still dealing in "Magic the Gathering" cards that would be even more evident. But the fact that they are operating an exchange in Bitcoin doesn't change that fact.
The March FinCen "Guidance" has some more specific language on Bitcoin, which is rather confusing. Here it is:
"A person that creates units of this convertible virtual currency and uses it to purchase real or virtual goods and services is a user of the convertible virtual currency and not subject to regulation as a money transmitter. By contrast, a person that creates units of convertible virtual currency and sells those units to another person for real currency or its equivalent is engaged in transmission to another location and is a money transmitter. In addition, a person is an exchanger and a money transmitter if the person accepts such de-centralized convertible virtual currency from one person and transmits it to another person as part of the acceptance and transfer of currency, funds, or other value that substitutes for currency."
One could indeed read this as meaning that in the opinion of FinCen, operating an exchange (like Mt.Gox) does, means that they are also in the business of transmitting money.
If so, such an opinion is entirely without merit.
Sure, if CI-1 buys a Bitcoin from some other third party (TP), then Mt.Gox transfers that Bitcoin from TP to CI-1, and the dollars in CI-1's account to TP.
But that is an exchange of things of equal value, at the market price when that exchange happens. It transfers exactly zero funds from CI-1 to TP, and exactly zero funds from TP to CI-1.
Even if it was possible to somehow get away with this overly broad construction of 18 USC § 1960 the Application for the Seizure Warrant seems to assume, there is the added question why a Japanese company operating in Shibuya, Tokyo, would be obliged to follow this American law. Didn't the American occupation of Japan end in 1952?
submitted by Karl-Friedrich_Lenz to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A simple, comprehensive guide for those interested in quickly acquiring bitcoins

I've been following bitcoin for a few years. Investing in BTC has a learning curve, but hopefully this guide will help you. I'll try to keep it as simple as possible. And please, if you have any questions post them, the bitcoin community is very helpful and I'm sure someone will be able to help. One more thing before I get started, I'd like to remind everyone that bitcoin isn't a get rich quick scheme. Think of it as a way to eliminate the middle men of money, the people that get rich off of manipulating fiat currencies at the cost of the societies and the world. Believe in bitcoin, not just for personal gain, but for positive effect it could have on the world. Check out this guy's great post: http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1bhhjg/any_bitcoin_millionaires_here_on_reddit_if_so/c96rn3p
This method uses 'Mt. Gox' in conjunction with 'Bitinstant' which are both trusted sites. Double check that the Mt. Gox site you use has the https:// in the address bar.
Quickest method, using cash (you will own BTC in a few hours):
  1. Go to https://www.mtgox.com and make a new account. (you don't need to verify)
  2. Go to 'Funding Options' on the left and choose 'Bitinstant'.
  3. Copy the 'Exchange Account' number.
  4. Click on the 'Bitinstant' link on the bottom of the page.
  5. On the 'Bitinstant' page, there will be a drop down box where you can choose a location to make a cash deposit that will go into your Mt. Gox account. There are numerous places you can make cash deposits including: Walmart, CVS, Jewel/Osco, and Albertsons.
  6. After choosing the location to make a cash deposit, fill out the rest of the Bitinstant page, including a test or two to prove you are a human.
  7. Click next and after accepting the terms and conditions on the next page there will be a receipt that you need to print out and take to the store where you're making the cash deposit.
  8. Go to store, deposit, funds will pop up in your Mt. Gox account and you are free to trade! Yay!!
Slower method, setting up Dwolla for use with Mt. Gox (takes about 7 days to buy BTC):
  1. Sign up for dwolla at https://www.dwolla.com. Add you bank account information so that you can add funds to your account.
  2. It will take 2-4 business days to verify your bank account (Dwolla will deposit small transactions into your bank account and you will need to show how much they were), in the meantime sign up for a Mt. Gox account at https://www.mtgox.com
  3. Once your bank account is verified, you should fund your dwolla account, which will take about 3-4 business days for the funds to clear.
  4. Once they're cleared, go to Mt. Gox and click 'fund your account'.
  5. Follow steps '3' and '4' above.
  6. On the 'Bitinstant' site, choose 'dwolla' as the funding source.
  7. Follow the instructions on 'Bitinstant' and you will have money in your Mt. Gox account within minutes and are free to trade. Yay!!
Hopefully this guide has helped guide you through the process of buying bitcoin. It definitely has a bit of a learning curve, but I hope I could help. Now, for the long term, you'd want to verify your information on Mt. Gox so that you can make bank account deposits and without the percentage fee that Bitinstant charges, but that process can take a while, especially now that Bitcoin has increased in popularity. Also, once you have bitcoin, it is important to find a safe 'wallet' that you can keep your bitcoins in. There isn't a bank to protect your money for you, you have to be smart and responsible. There are always a lot of posts about good wallet services in /Bitcoin, make sure to choose one that is trusted.
submitted by andrewforlife to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dwolla Shutting down CoinMKt and other Virtual Currency Exchanges what happens to us now?

Dwolla sent out emails notifying virtual currency exchanges they do not want their business another more. I have a coinMkt account and I only use Dwolla. What happens to them now?
Dwolla
As you know, Dwolla does not sell, accept, mine, value, take possession of, or hold Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product, and none of Dwolla’s users transact business with Dwolla using Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product. However, recent interest involving virtual currency and its exchanges has created uncertainty and confusion around virtual currency, and Dwolla's relationship with a small number of its exchanges. This has forced Dwolla to reassign resources, funds, and services.
As Dwolla gears up for a new stage of growth, we recognize that we can no longer sustain this merchant base (.1 percent of Dwolla merchants) and its unique needs, and that attempting to do so jeopardizes both of our communities' starkly different, but similarly ambitious, vision for improving payments.
Effective October 28, 2013 at 4pm CT, Dwolla will be withdrawing its service offerings to virtual currency exchanges and virtual currency related services.
We intend to work with you in meeting your needs and satisfying obligations to your customers. Here is a timeline of events you should anticipate. Today, October 10 (1500h, Eastern Time): Only existing Dwolla users will be able to send funds to your business. October 15 (1700h, Eastern Time): Your account will be limited to sending money only. You will no longer be able to receive funds from customers. You will be able to issue refunds to customers at this time. October 28 (1700h, Eastern Time): Your account will be suspended. No further activity will be provided. October 29 (1500h, Eastern Time): You will receive a copy of your final statements in .CSV format. We will transfer any remaining funds in the Dwolla system to your linked bank account. If you have more than one bank account linked, we will use the bank account with the most recent transaction, unless you notify us otherwise. October 30 (and subsequent dates): If Dwolla receives a reversal or chargeback, we will notify you by email to the address on file. The email will provide the name of the sender and the dollar amount involved. The amount of the reversal will be debited the next business day from your linked bank account. If we fail to recover funds, we may utilize collections procedures. If you wish to receive an affidavit from the financial institution, you may request one by emailing [email protected]. Please let us know what else we can do to assist with the transition.
Sincerely, Dwolla Support
submitted by jmaxim74 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why I'm buying Bitcoins

I first saw Bitcoin in December of last year, downloaded and ran the client, saw an exchange at $0.24, and was like, "meh" - another attempt at a currency. Good luck with that. I spent about half an hour, and moved on.
Last week, they came back on my radar, and after about a day of reading, and I decided to buy some (they were at $9.5USD/BTC then). I've seen a whole lot of people argue about a whole lot of different reasons and theories, but frankly, my reasons are simple.
However, the price of a Bitcoin is determined only by demand and utility. If no one wants them, the price goes down, if people do want them the price goes up. Given that that Bitcoins can be accepted by anyone using a computer - I think lots of people all over the world will want to use them, and their price could be extremely high, breaking through 100,1000, or many 10s of thousands or even higher in the months to come.
submitted by jmdugan to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

2250 WATT MODIFIED SERVER POWER SUPPLIES! PLUG AND PLAY! BUY IT NOW!

My partner and I have decided to share the wealth and offer all of you an opportunity to bring your Mining Rig or Rig's to the next level.
After countless hours of testing multiple server psu's to find the right one, we finally found it.
I am using these PSU's to run my 7 x 7970's Ghz editions and all 7 risers. I also am using the 5v on the PSU to run my GPU's on/off. One PSU per rig is plenty for my setup and I could even add 1 more GPU and riser if my MOBO would let me. ;D For you 7950 users, you could potentially run 2 or three rigs off of one of these, depending on how many cards per rig you do.
We are asking $299+shipping for the PSU. This PSU will come unlocked ready to use. It also comes with a 10ft 12 guage power cable with the correct 20amp 240v plug on the end. The PSU's will be set up in a semi-modular fashion, which will allow you to easily hook up each GPU.
We will also provide pre-made PCI-E cables with two 6+2 connectors on them for only $10 each. You are welcome to make your own cables, however if you do not know anything about proper wire sizing and length, I would let us do it.
Folks, this is no joke. This is the real deal. If you want to bring your mining to the next level, this is what you want. Clean, stable, highly efficient 12volt power. If you are building a new rig, perfect!
Keep in mind, you will need 240v circuits available to use these. Most homes in the US only have these circuits for Electric Dryers and Stoves. So you might need an electrician to add some more if possible. This is serious power and should not be taken lightly.
We will ship almost anywhere. Buyer pays shipping.
WARRANTY: We are modifying used/refurbished server power supplies, which have no warranty. However we will be giving a 90 day exchange policy, if it is defective. Buyer pays for shipping back to us, however we will refund your shipping cost if the PSU is DOA and we confirm it. Anything after 90 days we will not leave you in the dark and will handle on a case by case basis.
Payment: Full prepayment is required. We will accept Litecoin, Bitcoin, Dwolla, or PayPal. Payments are final. No refunds unless we are unable to provide you a power supply.
Timing: We will start ordering in what is needed as soon as we start getting orders. We can get these parts fairly quickly, so I am hoping we can have them shipped within 10 business days of purchase, possibley sooner.
Again, these PSU's have made my mining life so much better. They are running perfectly and made me much more confident in my rig's stability. These Power Supplies were designed to do exactly what we need them to do. That is, run full speed 24/7. ATX PSU's just don't compare. Considering a cheap 1600 watt ATX costs the same price, it seems to be a no brainer for me.
Please feel free to ask as many questions as possible. I will answer them the best I can. You can also email me at [email protected] if you would like.
I look forward to doing business with you. Happy Mining! :)
submitted by GEM-ROSE to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

Anyone have experiences with CampBX to fiat withdrawals?

Unfortunately I haven't convinced my landlord to accept Bitcoin or other cryptocurrency yet, so I need to pull out some fiat from CampBX by the end of next week to pay rent.
My plan is, this would be my first withdrawal from CampBX to Dwolla and under 1k USD. However, the Dwolla account is probably over a year old.
What I'm not understanding is if the 30 day withdrawal/deposit wait period listed on CampBX is dependent on the age of the Dwolla account itself, or the time that has passed since the first transaction to or from a Dwolla account to or from CampBX.
I have a nice old aged Dwolla account used for other exchange transactions for over a year now with no issues. I'm assuming I could withdraw to Dwolla without any real waiting period (aside from the CampBX treasurer and business hours that both look very reasonable)?
What are your experiences with this? My Dwolla to bank account and vice-versa transactions with other exchanges in the past have typically completed in 3 days no problem.
So far, I can't say I've had any complaints trading on CampBX.
submitted by usavvy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

campbx and dwolla breaking up?

got this email a few days ago:
Dear Dwolla Account Holder,
As you know, Dwolla does not sell, accept, mine, value, take possession of, or hold Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product, and none of Dwolla’s users transact business with Dwolla using Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product. However, recent interest involving virtual currency and its exchanges has created uncertainty and confusion around virtual currency, and Dwolla's relationship with a small number of its exchanges. This has forced Dwolla to reassign resources, funds, and services.
As Dwolla gears up for a new stage of growth, we recognize that we can no longer sustain this merchant base (.1 percent of Dwolla merchants) and its unique needs, and that attempting to do so jeopardizes both of our communities' starkly different, but similarly ambitious, vision for improving payments.
submitted by burlow44 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dwolla going bye bye

Just got this e-mail
Dear Dwolla Account Holder,
As you know, Dwolla does not sell, accept, mine, value, take possession of, or hold Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product, and none of Dwolla’s users transact business with Dwolla using Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product. However, recent interest involving virtual currency and its exchanges has created uncertainty and confusion around virtual currency, and Dwolla's relationship with a small number of its exchanges. This has forced Dwolla to reassign resources, funds, and services.
As Dwolla gears up for a new stage of growth, we recognize that we can no longer sustain this merchant base (.1 percent of Dwolla merchants) and its unique needs, and that attempting to do so jeopardizes both of our communities' starkly different, but similarly ambitious, vision for improving payments.
Effective October 28, 2013 at 4pm CT, Dwolla will be withdrawing its service offerings to virtual currency exchanges and virtual currency related services.
What does this mean? Your account, and its functionality, will remain unaffected. However, you can deactivate your account from within your Dwolla dashboard, if you so choose. Dwolla aims to provide its users and the few affected merchants with the guidance necessary to ensure a smooth transition. To do that, we encourage users to over-communicate with our support team, report any suspicious activity, and revisit our terms of service to ensure uninterrupted services. What is the timeline of events? October 10: Only existing users with a 30-day history with Dwolla will be able to send funds to merchants affected by this change. October 15: Affected merchants will be limited to sending money only, and will no longer be able to receive funds from customers. They will be able to issue refunds to customers at this time. October 28: Affected merchants’ accounts will be suspended. No further activity will be provided. October 29: Provided no security or fraud concerns, Dwolla will transfer any of the remaining funds inside the affected merchant's Dwolla account to its linked bank account. The decision to remove anyone from the network -- no matter the circumstances -- is not something Dwolla takes lightly. We are grateful for the opportunity to service and learn from these users. We wish the community and its pioneers the best.
submitted by mobgod to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

So I have money sitting in my Dwolla account. How do I get Bitcoins now?

So stupidly I did what I normally do when I need Bitcoin: I do a bank transfer into my Dwolla account, wait the ludicrous 4 business days for it to "complete", and then plan to transfer that money to mtgox to exchange for Bitcoins.
However, after seeing my transfer clear today, I went to mtgox to find out they no longer accept Dwolla as a funding option. I realize this is on me for not following the news, but what are my options now?
Mtgox isn't taking Dwolla as a funding option. Bitinstant isn't currently taking Dwolla transfers. CampBX requires a 30-day waiting period to withdraw.
Are there any other options to exchange this money directly from Dwolla to bitoin, without waiting for a 30-day account aging period?
submitted by cyrillus to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin for MTG!

If I told you that you can easily and quickly setup your own MTG virtual card shop for free; would that be of any interest to this community?
In these past few months Bitcoin has reached new levels of stability. With the downfall of Silkroad, the price spiked downwards briefly only to equalize back to it's previous rate only a half hour later.
With it becoming a legal currency in Germany, Canada is not only encouraging bitcoin; but is also planning it's own crypto-currency, China's google equivalent now accepts bitcoin along with it's government announcing no plans to regulate bitcoin; it's obvious that bitcoin is not what a lot of skeptics expected it to be.
With the average Bitcoin price constantly rising, and more merchants and vendors accepting Bitcoin, the benefits that bitcoin can offer MTG players is only more realistic.
Benefits MTG Players can get using Bitcoin
/MTG4BTC is coming back with a refreshed philosophy of facilitating a MTG/BTC economy.
We realize that reddit is no place for an auction house, yet this niche is specifically hindered by a lack of selection.
Thus we are requesting users to search bitmit for cards they want; and if the card(s) is not available, to request it on the subreddit.
If the card is not on bitmit; it is surely in someone's collection. The benefit of this model is that it allows MTG players without bitcoin to start earning and thus able to buy and request cards themselves. If bitcoiners request cards, and then pay someone who is new to bitcoin; that new bitcoiner can then spend their coin on cards themselves from another (potential) new user... or they can drop the savings into their wallet and watch it grow over the years! The point is that the choice is yours to make!
If your interested in participating in this new community, we'd love to see you stop by our humble home. There is information on the sidebar further detailing how to start selling and buying. I hope to see some of you on the flip side!
Side note: This sub is brand new in terms of a refresh and thus needs some fresh leadership. Vendors on bitmit with high karma level (anyone who sells cards and is friendly basically) are eligible to become moderators to help keep sub consistency and quality (as well as answer questions).
submitted by ForestOfGrins to magicTCG [link] [comments]

Email from Dwolla about Virtual Currencies!

I just received this email from Dwolla moments ago. Posted verbatim.
Dear Dwolla Account Holder,
As you know, Dwolla does not sell, accept, mine, value, take possession of, or hold Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product, and none of Dwolla’s users transact business with Dwolla using Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product. However, recent interest involving virtual currency and its exchanges has created uncertainty and confusion around virtual currency, and Dwolla's relationship with a small number of its exchanges. This has forced Dwolla to reassign resources, funds, and services.
As Dwolla gears up for a new stage of growth, we recognize that we can no longer sustain this merchant base (.1 percent of Dwolla merchants) and its unique needs, and that attempting to do so jeopardizes both of our communities' starkly different, but similarly ambitious, vision for improving payments.
Effective October 28, 2013 at 4pm CT, Dwolla will be withdrawing its service offerings to virtual currency exchanges and virtual currency related services.
What does this mean?
Your account, and its functionality, will remain unaffected. However, you can deactivate your account from within your Dwolla dashboard, if you so choose.
Dwolla aims to provide its users and the few affected merchants with the guidance necessary to ensure a smooth transition. To do that, we encourage users to over-communicate with our support team, report any suspicious activity, and revisit our terms of service to ensure uninterrupted services.
What is the timeline of events?
October 10: Only existing users with a 30-day history with Dwolla will be able to send funds to merchants affected by this change.
October 15: Affected merchants will be limited to sending money only, and will no longer be able to receive funds from customers. They will be able to issue refunds to customers at this time.
October 28: Affected merchants’ accounts will be suspended. No further activity will be provided.
October 29: Provided no security or fraud concerns, Dwolla will transfer any of the remaining funds inside the affected merchant's Dwolla account to its linked bank account.
The decision to remove anyone from the network -- no matter the circumstances -- is not something Dwolla takes lightly. We are grateful for the opportunity to service and learn from these users. We wish the community and its pioneers the best.
Sincerely, Dwolla Support
submitted by evand82 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Bitcoin Show -- Episode 029 Bitcoin Ben  #LTC, #Exchanges, Companies that accept #cryptocurrency 8 Cryptocurrency Exchanges for Buying and Selling Fiat ... Top Best Cryptocurrency Exchanges in 2019 Best Bitcoin For Mac

Payment network Dwolla prepares to block Bitcoin and virtual currency exchanges. Dwolla is a payment network that allows any business or person to send, request and accept money. Their pitch is low flat fees, or in some cases no fees at all, to send money. "Dear. As you know, Dwolla does not sell, accept, mine, value, take possession of, or hold Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product, and none of Dwolla’s users transact business with Dwolla using Bitcoin or any other virtual currency product. Payment network Dwolla prepares to block Bitcoin and virtual currency exchanges. Dwolla is a payment network that allows any business or person to send, request and accept money. Their pitch is low flat fees, or in some cases no fees at all, to send money. It appears that some U.S.-based Bitcoin exchanges have, in fact, registered as money-transmitters, which would obviate seizure based on the money-transmitter registration requirement. Whether the government attempts to attack Bitcoin with any other legal theories is an open question. Bitbuy.ca is a Canadian owned and operated digital currency platform. Originally founded as InstaBT in 2013, the company’s mission is to provide convenient, dependable and secure access to bitcoin and other digital currencies. Customer service, ease of use, and quick turnaround times for deposits and withdrawals are pillars of this platform.

[index] [8616] [18957] [22493] [34440] [5850] [19809] [5902] [692] [23033] [12906]

The Bitcoin Show -- Episode 029

What are the top 8 cryptocurrency exchanges for buying and selling fiat currencies like USD, EUR, CAD, GBP, KRW, JPY, RUB, and CNH into Bitcoin, Ethereum, Li... Top Cryptocurrency Exchanges in 2019 - grouped up from best to worst. https://boxmining.com/top-cryptocurrency-exchanges-2019/ #Cryptocurrency #Exchanges #Bi... To read more about bitcoin paper wallet, go to internet site the following: http://www.cryptocoinwalletcards.com/ Tags: asic bitcoin miner, asic bitcoin mine... Here's how you set up the 3 accounts to get the automation working end-to-end between MtGox, Dwolla, and AutoMtGox.com. ... The Bitcoin Show - Duration: 19:36. vlogwrap 60,478 views. Atlanta based Bitcoin Exchange site CampBx.com explains how his site works and services provided. Update on the situation regarding Dwolla.com; (reversing transactions without notification) Category

#