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A Good Pentesting Tools List

Collection of pentesting tools by BrainfuckSec

Anti Forensics Tools
Exploitation Tools
Forensics Tools
Information Gathering
Keyloggers
Maintaining Access
Password Attacks
Reverse Engineering
Sniffing Spoofing
Social Engineering
Vulnerability Analysis
Web Applications
Web Shells
Wireless Attacks
submitted by _brainfuck to Pentesting [link] [comments]

Software you would like to see added to HomelabOS?

Note, this is not intended to be an ask that anyone do anything to add this software to HomelabOS. Rather it's intended to capture the list of software I want to add eventually. Perhaps it will be of interest to others. I'm also curious to see what's on other people's lists.
Here's my top 3:
Media
Payments
Security
Collaboration
Communication
Pastebin
Filesharing
Search
Sysadmin
Accounting
submitted by cat-gun to HomelabOS [link] [comments]

How to set up an incentivized node in Ubuntu [likely works for other Linux as well…]

There has been a post lately about how you can participate in a program by bitnodes which is intended to incentivize running a full node.
In the comment section of the post there were some instruction by AndrewToth as to how to set the whole thing up. Unfortunately it didn’t work for me directly. I would therefore like to share how I finally managed to get it done.
If you would like to run a scrip to do all the heavy lifting for you, please perform steps 1, 2 and 12 now and then just copy paste this into the terminal and hit enter: wget -O bitnodes-incentive.sh http://pastebin.com/download.php?i=607WQaBy && sed -i 's/\/' bitnodes-incentive.sh && chmod +x bitnodes-incentive.sh && ./bitnodes-incentive.sh The script will also advise you to do the required port forwarding. You can look at the script here.
1 Find out your local IP by opening a terminal and typeifconfig. You will see your local IP listed under eth0 as inet addr. In the subsequent steps of this tutorial it will be referenced as $localip. So whenever you read $localip it means, your local IP you have just found out. It would be helpful to make this IP static.
2 Set up a full node. You need to download Bitcon Core, run it until you are synchronized. It needs to allow more than 8 connections and you therefore need to turn on port forwarding on your router. So if the machine which runs the full node has $localip in your subnet, you need to tell your router to forward port 8333 to $localip port 8333. If you open Bitcoin-QT it will tell you on the lower right corner, how many connections it has. If the number turns >8 after 5-10 minutes, you are all set. If you need a more detailed tutorial, you may try this one. Beware, if you don’t run a full node yet, allow it between 12 and 24 hours to synch.
3 Now you need to know your own public IP address. You can e.g. find it out like this. In the subsequent steps of this tutorial it will be referenced as $ip, so whenever you reed $ip it means, your public IP you have just found out.
4 Get a Bitcoin address. Please use one which you control the key to. I guess you know the deal. In the subsequent steps of this tutorial it will be referenced as $address, so whenever you reed $address it means, your Bitcoin address.
5 Open a new terminal and copy paste the following into the terminal each followed by enter key (beware $address means your address, no “$” sign needed): mkdir bitcoin-address cd bitcoin-address vi index.html i $address You will see a lot of “~” in the terminal. Don’t worry. It’s supposed to be like that.
6 Hit the escape key.
7 Type :wq and hit enter key.
8 Type python -m SimpleHTTPServer 8000 and hit enter key. In case you should have to restart this web-server you will have to do it from the "bitcoin-address" directory created in step 5. want to use alternative port?
9 Now go back to your router configuration page and set it to forward port 80 to $localip port 8000. Beware, $localip is not your public IP which you have found out in step 3 but the subnet IP of the machine you run your node on which you have found out in step 1.
10 Confirm steps 5-9 worked by using a different internet connection (e.g. 4g on your phone) and type $ip in the address bar. You should see a simple webpage with only your Bitcoin address on. If you see that, you are set to go on.
11 Activate your node by opening your web browser and entering https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/$ip-8333/ in the address bar. Beware of the $ip you have to replace with your specific parameter.
12 Open a new terminal and copy paste sudo apt-get install curl and hit enter key. You will be asked for your root password to do this step.
13 Open a new terminal and copy paste this:curl -H 'Accept: application/json; indent=4' -d 'bitcoin_address=$address' -d 'url=http://$ip' https://bitnodes.21.co/api/v1/nodes/$ip-8333/ Beware of the $address and $ip (2x) you have to replace with your specific parameters. There is a "success": true message in the terminal after this step.
14 Open your browser on the system with runs your node and the following in the address bar: https://bitnodes.21.co/api/v1/nodes/$ip-8333/ Beware of the $ip you have to replace with your specific parameter. Url and bitcoin_address parameters should not be empty. If you wait ten minutes and reload the page you should also get "verified": true. This means you are now in the node incentive program. Any incentives will be payed to your Bitcoin address, shall you receive any. I think it depends on luck.
15 Open your browser on the system which runs your node and the following in the address bar: https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/$ip-8333/ Beware of the $ip you have to replace with your specific parameter. Alternatively just reload the page from step 11 if you still have it open. You can now see some statistics for your node plus you should also be able to see it’s Bitcon address and verification url.
16 You can see where your node is in the leaderboard by entering this into the address bar of your browser: https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/leaderboard/?q=$ip Beware of the $ip you have to replace with your specific parameter. You can now see the PIX rank of your node. It needs to be above 8 to have your node successfully in the ballot. PIX rank explanation given on the site.
Thanks to bitnodes.io, Addy Yeow and AndrewToth for helping me out to set up my own incentivized node.
Now I wish you all the best! Please tell me if it works, I will be back later to answer questions or correct things.
Edit1: I have done lots of formatting updates. Added Point 14 16.
Edit2: Added steps proposed by Explodicle. Installation of curl and activation of node at bitnode.io.
Edit3: Added the dedicated folder for web-server index.html
Edit4: Alternative port options added as suggested by n00tz.
Edit5: Awesome script added to top section. All props to Explodicle.
Edit6: Changed instructions and the script to work with new address "bitnodes.21.co" instead of "getaddr.bitnodes.io"
submitted by SimonBelmond to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[For Hire] I'm Shackra, your gentle web data miner for all your information needs, I charge per mined record!

Hello, I'm shackra !
As a freelancer I have worked several times for clients interested in mining information from websites and structuring such data for later processing, now as I have grow professionally and updated my stack for this particular field I would like to offer my services as data miner.
Usually, data miners often charge per time consumed for a particular project or per the complexity of the site to mine, in my case you will receive a flat fee based on the number of records mined from the site. A record is a row of data divided by columns which is a structure that eases data processing by other tools. The mining process is done in a way that is gentle and respectful to the website.

What to do to request my service?

If you are interested, please send me a PM filling the following form, I will review the site and be back to you in a couple of hours (Just take into account that I may be sleeping if you contact from the other side of the planet :D):
- Website's URL entry point, where the mining should start!: - Credentials if required, keywords to search if needed, etc: - Steps, or *what does the miner need to do to find the data you have interest in?*: 1. Visit URL inside entry point, or search for keyword, etc. 2. Find this particular element in the page (**Be sure to provide a screenshot with the element highlighted and include the URL of that page too for further examination by me**), store as `FieldA`, etc. 3. Go to the next page, or visit the other entry point, or mine this other particular element in the page and store it as `FieldB`, etc. 4. Repeat all steps until ... (This is implied actually) - Under which formats you want receive the results?, available options are: `CSV`, `TSV`, `JSON`. 

What's next after contacting you, pal?

I will review your request and send you a notice regarding the project, if accepted I will handcraft the miner for the website and you will get another notice when the miner is started, 24 hours later I will tell you how many records the miner has collected from the website and then you can buy as many records as you want or wait a little more and let the miner do its job :D.

⚠ Terms and conditions ⚠

Past jobs (Most recents on top)

Price and payment options!

Each record costs 0.012 USD$ :), the price remains the same no matter how many columns a record is composed of. If the website cannot provide 2500 records, a fixed price will be use instead, which is 30 USD$.
The delivery of the records will happen after the invoice is 100% cancelled. If the total data is more than 1MiB compressed with 7zip I will try to deliver it by email otherwise Dropbox will be use.

Final words...

Please don't hesitate to make questions in the comments. Sending a job request does not entail either part have some sort of compromise with doing the project, thus don't be shy contacting me in private! :).
submitted by shackra to forhire [link] [comments]

Another way to look at the bubbles

This is a follow up to a post I made a couple of days ago looking at the log-linear regression of bitcoin prices:
http://www.reddit.com/BitcoinMarkets/comments/21smpsome_perspective_on_the_current_pessimism/
This post is going to look at this regression again, but this time using it to make comparisons between Bitcoin's bubbles.
One way to compare Bitcoin's bubble periods is by categorizing periods on the basis of how far away they are from the regression line. The set of these distance measures is known as the 'residuals'. What I've done in this chart is colour code each price depending on where on a set of ranges its residual value falls.
http://i.imgur.com/y1Klgum.png
How did I select the ranges I did? Semi-arbitrarily (if anyone knows of a less-arbitrary way to do this let me know). The residuals seem to cluster to some degree around certain ranges when you look at them in a histogram. So that's why I chose the ranges that I did.
http://i.imgur.com/FbqtIfV.png
What I think a chart like this is representing is how far away bitcoin is from its exponential growth trend. So a bubble is interpreted relative to that growth trend and not its absolute growth in value. This gives different results from when you just look at absolute price growth.
For example - if you compare the 2012/13 bubble with the 2013/14 bubble on the basis of the absolute amount of price growth then the former of these is the larger bubble with about 13x price growth compared to about 8x. But from the perspective of the price relative to the exponential growth trend, the latter is clearly larger. How is this possible, you can see it easily from the chart. The 2012/13 bubble came off a much larger slump relative to the trend (a blue zone) - whereas the 2013/14 bubble had less ground to make up. It started in a green zone. Furthermore, while the 2012/13 bubble makes it into the orange zone - it only stays there briefly. It's really mostly a yellow level event. The 2013/14 bubble is is definitively an orange level event and even gets into the red zone for a day.
The 2011 bubble is less interesting from this perspective since it is big in all respects - both price growth and its residuals. Notice also how some quite large price increases (3x in jun-aug 2012) don't even count as bubbles on this analysis even though they have the same triangle shape as the others.
In terms of the current downtrend it provides an extra rationalisation as to why things aren't that grim. We are currently in a green period - which is the most common colour by far. Green is not a bad place to be if you care about whether or not Bitcoin is maintaining its long term trend. Blue is where things start to get concerning. If that chart ever registers a significant period of purple - that's when I'm going to start to freak out for bitcoin's long term future.
As always - take this stuff with large pinches of salt. If you look at this stuff yourself, I recommend trying to come up with alternative (principled) ways of choosing your colour regions. You can also experiment with using different time frames. If you start your regression at the beginning of the 2012/13 bubble then it becomes much larger than the 2013/14 bubble. I personally don't think this is appropriate if you are looking at the long term exponential growth - but you gotta bear it in mind.
One other thing - this data swaps from the mtgox to bitstamp data. I feel mtgox data is generally to be avoided, because of the way it skewed the market - but it's all we have from the early periods.
Here is the code for those who want to play. About to hit the town for some booze n ladies... so won't respond to comments questions (if any) until tomorrow. :)
import json, requests import pandas as pd import numpy as np import datetime as dt import operator import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib.dates as mdates def get_data(api_name): ''' pulls data from the quandl api api_name either 'BITSTAMPUSD' or 'MTGOXUSD' ''' url = 'http://www.quandl.com/api/v1/datasets/BITCOIN/{0}.json'.format(api_name) r = requests.get(url) raw_data = r.json() # put the data in a Pandas DataFrame object data = pd.DataFrame(raw_data['data'], columns=raw_data['column_names']) # change the order so the earliest records are first data = data.reindex(index=data.index[::-1]) # reset the index order increasing from 0 data['i'] = range(0,len(data)) data = data.set_index('i') return data bitstamp_data = get_data('BITSTAMPUSD') mtgox_data = get_data('MTGOXUSD') #change the dates to python datetime objects bitstamp_data['Date'] = pd.to_datetime(bitstamp_data['Date']) mtgox_data['Date'] = pd.to_datetime(mtgox_data['Date']) # select the mt gox data prior to bitstamp pre_bitstamp = mtgox_data[(mtgox_data['Date'] < bitstamp_data['Date'][0])] # whack the mtgox and bitstamp data together data = pre_bitstamp.append(bitstamp_data) data['i'] = range(0,len(data)) data = data.set_index('i') # Data has some bad values. Replace them with previous days data # First replace the bad values with a NaN value data.loc[(data['Open']==1.7e+308), 'Open':] = np.nan # now replace the NaN values with the previous days values data = data.fillna(method='pad') # create X and Y for the regression X = pd.DataFrame(index=data.index) X['0'] = 1 X['1'] = data.index # convert the price data to a log10 scale Y = pd.DataFrame(index=data.index) Y['0'] = np.log10(data.loc[:, 'Weighted Price']) # convert to numpy matrices for use in the normal equation X = X.as_matrix() Y = Y.as_matrix() # Normal equation (works much better than gradient descent in this case) X_T = X.transpose() theta = np.linalg.inv(X_T.dot(X)).dot(X_T).dot(Y) # use theta to plot the regression regress = X.dot(theta) # create a histogram of the residuals (difference between actual and predicted values) diff = Y - regress bins = np.linspace(diff.min()-0.2, diff.max()+0.2 , 80) plt.hist(diff, bins) plt.show() # select groups of residuals for colouring # ranges are selected on the (semi-arbitrary) basis of how they appear to be grouped in the # histogram above. purple = ((diff > -1.0) & (diff < -0.65)).flatten() blue = ((diff > -0.65) & (diff < -0.31)).flatten() green = ((diff > -0.31) & (diff < 0.0)).flatten() yellow = ((diff > 0.0) & (diff < 0.27)).flatten() orange = ((diff > 0.27) & (diff < 0.6)).flatten() red = ((diff > 0.6) & (diff < 1)).flatten() pink = (diff > 1.0).flatten() # Create the chart # Let matplotlib do the work of selecting date ticks plt.gca().xaxis.set_major_formatter(mdates.DateFormatter('%Y-%m-%d')) plt.gca().xaxis.set_major_locator(mdates.AutoDateLocator()) # plotting the raw price data and then log scaling the chart plt.plot(data['Date'], data['Weighted Price']) # regression data is already in log scale, so scale it back up. plt.plot(data['Date'], 10 ** regress) # apply the log scale to the chart plt.axes().set_yscale('log') plt.xlabel('Date') plt.ylabel('Price (USD)') plt.grid() # Plot the residuals plt.scatter(data['Date'][purple], data['Weighted Price'][purple], marker='x', c='#2E0854', label="-1.0 < res < -0.65") plt.scatter(data['Date'][blue], data['Weighted Price'][blue], marker='x', c='b', label="-0.65 < res < -0.31") plt.scatter(data['Date'][green], data['Weighted Price'][green], marker='x', c='g', label="-0.31 < res < 0.0") plt.scatter(data['Date'][yellow], data['Weighted Price'][yellow], marker='x', c='y', label="0.0 < res < 0.27") plt.scatter(data['Date'][orange], data['Weighted Price'][orange], marker='x', c='#FF6600', label="0.27 < res < 0.6") plt.scatter(data['Date'][red], data['Weighted Price'][red], marker='x', c='r', label="0.6 < res < 1.0") plt.scatter(data['Date'][pink], data['Weighted Price'][pink], marker='x', c='#ff69b4', label="1.0 < res") # add the legend handles, labels = plt.axes().get_legend_handles_labels() plt.legend(handles, labels, loc=2) plt.show() 
submitted by grovulent to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Bi-Weekly Rational Feed

===Highly Recommended Articles:
Superintelligence Risk Project Update II by Jeff Kaufman - Jeff's thoughts and the sources he found most useful. Project is wrapping up in a few day. Topics: Technical Distance to AI. Most plausible scenarios of Superintelligence risk. OpenPhil's notes on how progress was potentially stalled in Cryonics and Nanotech.
Superintelligence Risk Project Update by Jeff Kaufman - Links to the three most informative readings on AI risk. Details on the large number of people Jeff has talked to. Three fundamental points of view on AI-Safety. Three Fundamental points of disagreement. An update on the original questions Jeff was trying to answer.
Podcast The World Needs Ai Researchers Heres How To Become One by 80,000 Hours - "OpenAI’s latest plans and research progress. Concrete Papers in AI Safety, which outlines five specific ways machine learning algorithms can act in dangerous ways their designers don’t intend - something OpenAI has to work to avoid. How listeners can best go about pursuing a career in machine learning and AI development themselves."
Radical Book Club The Decentralized Left by davidzhines (Status 451) - The nature of leftwing organizing and what righties can learn from it. An exposition of multiple books on radical left organization building. Major themes are "doing the work" and "decentralized leadership".
Study Of The Week To Remediate Or Not To Remediate by Freddie deBoer - Should low math proficiency students take remedial algebra or credit bearing statistics. The City University of New York ran an actual randomized study to test this. The study had pretty good controls. For example students were randomly assigned to three groups, participating professors taught one section of each group.
Kenneth Arrow On The Welfare Economics Of Medical Care A Critical Assessment by Artir (Nintil) - "Kenneth Arrow wrote a paper in 1963, Uncertainty and the Welfare Economics of Medical Care. This paper tends to appear in debates regarding whether healthcare can be left to the market (like bread), or if it should feature heavy state involvement. Here I explain what the paper says, and to what extent it is true."
Becoming Stronger Together by b4yes (lesswrong) - "About a year ago, a secret rationalist group was founded. This is a report of what the group did during that year."
The Destruction Of American Cuisine by Small Truths - America used to have a tremendous number of regional cuisines, most are dead. They were killed by supermarkets and frozen food. This has been costly both in terms of culture and health (antibiotic resistance, crop monoculture risk)
===Scott:
Targeting Meritocracy by Scott Alexander - Education and merit are different. Programming is one of the last meritocracies, this lets disadvantaged people get into the field. If a job is high impact we want to hire on merit. The original, literal meaning of meritocracy is important.
Classified Thread 2 Best In Classified by Scott Alexander - Scott is promoting a project to accelerate the trend of rationalists living near each other. There are four houses available for rent near Ward Street in Berkeley. Ward street is currently the rationalist hub in the Bay. Commenters can advertise other projects and services.
Url Of Sandwich by Scott Alexander - Standard links post, somewhat longer than usual.
Opec Thread by Scott Alexander - Bi-weekly open thread. Update on Scott and Katja's travels. Salt Lake City Meetup highlight. Topher Brennan is running for Senate.
Can We Link Perception And Cognition by Scott Alexander - SSC survey optical illusions. "So there seems to be a picture where high rates of perceptual ambiguity are linked to being weirder and (sometimes, in a very weak statistical way) lower-functioning." Speculation about fundamental connections between perception and cognitive style. Ideas for further research.
Change Minds Or Drive Turnout by Scott Alexander - Extreme candidates lower turnout among their own party. Is base turnout really the only thing that matters? Lots of quotes from studies.
===Rationalist:
Learning From Past Experiences by mindlevelup - "This is about finding ways to quickly learn from past experiences to inform future actions. We briefly touch upon different learning models." Model-based and Model-Free reinforcement learning. Practical advice and examples.
How Long Has Civilization Been Going by Elo (BearLamp) - Human agricultural society is only 342-1000 generations old. "Or when you are 24 years old you have lived one day for every year humans have had written records." Human civilization is only a few hundred lifetimes old.
Choices Are Bad by Zvi Moshowitz - Choices reduce perceived value. Choices require time and energy. Making someone choose is imposing a real cost.
Erisology Of Self And Will: The Gulf by Everything Studies - "Part 4 will discuss some scientific disciplines with bearing on the self, and how their results are interpreted differently by the traditional paradigm vs. the scientific."
Philosophy Vs Duck Tests by Robin Hanson - Focusing on deep structure vs adding up weak cues. If it looks like an x... More discussion of whether most people will consider ems people and/or conscious.
Knowing How To Define by AellaGirl - "These are three ways in which a word can be ‘defined’ – the role it plays in the world around it (the up-definition), synonyms (lateral-definition), and the parts which construct the thing (down-definition)." Applications to morality and free-will.
Change Is Bad by Zvi Moshowitz - "Change space, like mind space, is deep and wide. Friendly change space isn’t quite to change space what friendly mind space is to mind space, but before you apply any filters of common sense, it’s remarkably close." A long list of conditions that mean change has lower expected value. Why we still need to make changes. Keep your eyes open.
Meditation Insights Suffering And Pleasure Are Intrinsically Bound Together by Kaj Sotala - The concrete goal of meditation is to train your peripheral awareness. Much suffering comes from false promises of pleasure. Procrastinating to play a videogame won't actually make you feel better. Temptation losses its power once you truly see the temptations for what they truly are.
Be My Neighbor by Katja Grace - Katja lives in a rationalist house on ward street in Berkeley and its great. The next step up is a rationalist neighborhood. Katja is promoting the same four houses as Scott. Be her neighbor?
What Value Subagents by G Gordan (Map and Territory) - Splitting the mind into subagents is a common rationalist model (links to Alicorn, Briene Yudkowsky, etc). However the author preferred model is a single process with inconsistent preferences. Freud. System 1 and System 2. The rider and the Elephant become one. Subagents as masks. Subagents as epicycles.
The Order Of The Soul by Ben Hoffman (Compass Rose) - The philosophy of accepting things vs the impulse to reshape them. Many philosophical and psychological models split the soul into three. Internalized authority vs seeing the deep structure of moral reality. In some sense math is the easiest thing in the world to learn. School poisons the enjoyment of rational thought. Lockhart's lament. Feynman. Eichmann and thinking structurally.
Aliens Merely Sleeping by Tyler Cowen - The universe is currently too hot for artificial life to be productive. Advanced civilizations might be freezing themselves until the universe cools. "They could achieve up to 1030 times more than if done today" [short]
Book Reviews by Torello (lesswrong) - Rationalist Adjacent. Each book has an interesting 'ideas per page' rating. Homo Deus, Sapiens, Super-intelligence, Surfaces and Essences, What Technology Wants, Inside Jokes, A Skeptic's Guide to the Mind.
Geometers Scribes Structure Intelligence by Ben Hoffman (Compass Rose) - "How does spatial reasoning lead to formal, logical reasoning?" Fluid and crystalized intelligence. Some history of Philosophy. How social dynamics lead to the evolution of reasoning. Talmudic and Western law, and their oddities. Universal Grammar and connecting with the divine. FizzBuzz.
High Dimensional Societies by Robin Hanson - In high dimensional space the distance between points varies less. What implications does this have for 'spatial' social science models (ex analogues of 1D spectrums and 2D graphs).
Feelings In The Map by Elo (BearLamp) - Confusion is not a property of the external world. The same holds for many emotions. Non-violent communication and speaking from your own perspective.
Lesswrong Is Not About Forum Software by enye-word (lesswrong) - The best way to increase activity on lesswrong is to get back the top posters, especially Scott and Eliezer.
Explication by mindlevelup - "This essay is about explication, the notion of making things specific. I give some examples involving Next Actions and systematization. This might also just be obvious to many people. Part of it is also a rehash of Act Into Uncertainty. Ultimately, explication is about changing yourself."
Concrete Instructions by Elo (BearLamp) - "The objective test of whether the description is concrete is whether the description can be followed by an anonymous person to produce the same experience." Some examples including the 'paper folding game'.
Human Seems Low Dimensional by Robin Hanson - 'Humanness' seems to be a one dimensional variable. Hence people are likely to consider ems conscious and worthy of decent treatment since ems are human-like on many important factors. Some discussion of a study where people rated how human-like various entities were.
Erisology Of Self And Will: A Natural Offering by Everything Studies - A description of naturalism and it relation to science. Daniel Dennet. Many philosophers are still dualists about the self. The self as a composite. Freedom as emergent.
The Hungry Brain by Bayesian Investor - A short review that focuses on the basics of Guynet's ideas and meta-discussion of why Guynet included so much neuroscience. "Guyenet provides fairly convincing evidence that it’s simple to achieve a healthy weight while feeling full. (E.g. the 20 potatoes a day diet)."
Boost From The Best by Robin Hanson - [Age of Em] How many standard deviations above the mean will be the best em be? How much better will they be than the second best em? How much of a wage/leisure premium will the best em receive.
Becoming Stronger Together by b4yes (lesswrong) - "About a year ago, a secret rationalist group was founded. This is a report of what the group did during that year."
In Praise Of Fake Frameworks by Valentine (lesswrong) - "I use a lot of fake frameworks — that is, ways of seeing the world that are probably or obviously wrong in some important way. I think this is an important skill. There are obvious pitfalls, but I think the advantages are more than worth it. In fact, I think the "pitfalls" can even sometimes be epistemically useful."
Letter To Future Layperson by Sailor Vulcan (BYS) - A letter from someone in our age to someone post singularity. Description of the hardships and terrors of pre-singularity life. Emotional and poetic. ~5K words.
===AI:
Conversation With An Ai Researcher by Jeff Kaufman - The anonymous researcher thinks AI progress is almost entirely driven by hardware and data. Back propagation has existed for a long time. Go would have taken at least 10 more years if go-aI work had remained constrained by academic budgets.
Openai Baselines PPO by Open Ai - "We’re releasing a new class of reinforcement learning algorithms, Proximal Policy Optimization (PPO), which perform comparably or better than state-of-the-art approaches while being much simpler to implement and tune. PPO has become the default reinforcement learning algorithm at OpenAI because of its ease of use and good performance."
Superintelligence Risk Project Update II by Jeff Kaufman - Jeff's thoughts and the sources he found most useful. Project is wrapping up in a few day. Topics: Technical Distance to AI. Most plausible scenarios of Superintelligence risk. OpenPhil's notes on how progress was potentially stalled in Cryonics and Nanotech.
Real Debate Robots Education by Tyler Cowen - Robots are already becoming part of the classroom. K-12 is an artificially creation anyway. Robots can help autistic or disabled children. Children sometimes trust robots too much.
Robust Adversarial Inputs by Open Ai - "We’ve created images that reliably fool neural network classifiers when viewed from varied scales and perspectives. This challenges a claim from last week that self-driving cars would be hard to trick maliciously since they capture images from multiple scales, angles, perspectives, and the like."
What Is Overfitting Exactly by Andrew Gelman - "If your model is correct, “overfitting” is impossible. In its usual form, “overfitting” comes from using too weak of a prior distribution."
Conversation With Bryce Wiedenbeck by Jeff Kaufman - "AGI is possible, it could be a serious problem, but we can't productively work on it now." AGI will look very different from current technologies. Utility functions are a poor model of human behavior.
Examples Of Superintelligence Risk by Jeff Kaufman - A series of extended quotes describing ways AI with innocent seeming goals can destroy the world. Authors: Nick Bostrom, Eliezer (and collaborators), Luke M, 80K hours, Tim Urban. Jeff finds them unpersuasive and asks for better ones. Lots of interesting comments. Eleizer himself comments describing how 'paperclip maximizers' might realistically occur.
Superintelligence Risk Project Update by Jeff Kaufman - Links to the three most informative readings on AI risk. Details on the large number of people Jeff has talked to. Three fundamental points of view on AI-Safety. Three Fundamental points of disagreement. An update on the original questions Jeff was trying to answer.
Conversation With Michael Littman by Jeff Kaufman - CS Professor at Brown's opinions: Deep Learning is surprisingly brittle in his experience. General Intelligence will require large fundamental advances. The AI risk community isn't testing their ideas so they probably aren't making real progress.
===EA:
EAGX Relaunch by Roxanne_Heston (EA forum) - The EA global satellite EAGA-X conferences have been low activity. Changes: More funding and flexibility. Standardized formats. Fewer groups approved. Stipends to primary organizers.
Uncertainty Smoothes Out Differences In Impact by The Foundational Research Institute - Many inside view evaluations conclude that one intervention is orders of magnitude more effective than another. Uncertainty significantly reduces these ratios.
Autonomy: A Search For A Measure Will Pearson (EA forum) - "I shall introduce a relatively formal measure of autonomy, based on the intuition that it is the ability to do things by yourself with what you have. The measure introduced allows you to move from less to more autonomy, without being black and white about it. Then I shall talk about how increasing autonomy fits in with the values of movements such as poverty reduction, ai risk reduction and the reduction of suffering."
Eight media articles on GiveDirectly, Cash Transers and Basic Income.- A world where 8 men own as much wealth as 3.6 billion people by GiveDirectly -
More Giving Vs Doing by Jeff Kaufman - EA is moving far more money than it used to and the ramp up will continue. This means direct work has become relatively more valuable. Nonetheless giving money is still useful, capacity isn't being filled. Jeff plans on earning to give based on his personal constraints.
Why I Think The Foundational Research Institute by Mike Johnson (EA forum) - A description of the FRI. Good things about FRI. FRI's research framework and why the author is worried. Eight long objections. TLDR: "functionalism ("consciousness is the sum-total of the functional properties of our brains") sounds a lot better than it actually turns out to be in practice. In particular, functionalism makes it impossible to define ethics & suffering in a way that can mediate disagreements."
Tranquilism by The Foundational Research Institute - A paper arguing that reducing suffering is more important than promoting happiness. Axiology. Non-consciousness. Common Objections. Conclusion.
An Argument For Why The Future May Be Good by Ben West (EA forum) - Factory farming shows that humans are deeply cruel. Technology enabled this cruelty, perhaps the future will be even darker. Counterargument: Humans are lazy, not evil. Humans as a group will spend at least small amounts altruistically. In the future the cost of reducing suffering will go down low enough that suffering will be rare or non-existent.
Arguments Moral Advocacy by The Foundational Research Institute - "What does moral advocacy look like in practice? Which values should we spread, and how? How effective is moral advocacy compared to other interventions such as directly influencing new technologies? What are the most important arguments for and against focusing on moral advocacy?"
An Argument For Broad And Inclusive by Kaj Sotala (EA forum) - "I argue for a very broad, inclusive EA, based on the premise that the culture of a region is more important than any specific group within that region... As a concrete strategy, I propose a division into low-level and high-level EA"
Not Everybody wants a Goat by GiveDirectly - Eight links on GiveDirectly, Cash Transfers, Effective Altruism and Basic Income.
Mid Year Update by The GiveWell Blog - Encouraging more charities to apply. More research of potential interventions. Short operations recap. GiveWell is focusing more on outreach.
===Politics and Economics:
College Tuition by Tom Bartleby - Sticker prices for college have gone up 15K in twenty years, but the average actual cost has only gone up 2.5K. High prices are almost compensated by high aid. Advantage: more equitable access to education. Disadvantages: Not everyone knows about the aid, financial aid is large enough it can seriously distort family financial decisions.
War Of Wages Part 1 Apples And Walmarts by Jacob Falkovich (Put A Number On It!) - The Author thinks minimum wage hurts the poor. Walmart can't afford higher wages. Copenhagan Interpretation of Ethics: Walmart helps the poor and gets blamed, Apple does nothing for the poor but avoids blame.
Links 10 by Artir (Nintil) - Tons of links. Economics, Psychology, AI, Philosophy, Misc.
Pretend Ask Answer by Ben Hoffman (Compass Rose) - A short dialogue about Patriarchy and the meaning of oppression. Defensive actions are often a response to bad faith from the other side. Its not ok to explicitly say you think your partner is arguing in bad faith.
Cultural Studies Ironically Is Something Of A Colonizer by Freddie deBoer - An origin story for Writing Studies. The fields initial methodological diversity. Cultural studies took over the field, empirical work has been pushed out. Evidence that some cultural studies professors really do believe its fundamentally bigoted to do science and empirical research endangers marginalized students. The field has become insular.
The Dark Arts Examples From The Harris Adams Debate by Stabilizer (lesswrong) - The author accuses Scott Adams of using various dark Arts: Changing the subject, Motte-and-bailey, Euphemisation, Diagnosis, Excusing, Cherry-picking evidence.
Study Of The Week Modest But Real Benefits From Lead Exposure Interventions by Freddie deBoer - Freddie reviews a survey he found via SSC. The study had very good controls. Methodology is explained and key graphs are posted and discussed. Scott and Freddie seem to agree on the facts but have a different opinion on how large to consider the effects.
Descriptive And Prescriptive Standards by Simon Penner (Status 451) - Leadership means winning the Keynesian Beauty Contest. Public opinion doesn't exist as a stable reality. Prescribing public opinion. Dangers of social reform and leaders twisting the facts to promote noble outcomes.
A Taylorism For All Seasons by Lou (sam[]zdat) - "Christopher Lasch – The Culture of Narcissism, part 1/X, current essay being more of an overview." A Masquerade where you must act out the mask you choose.
Mechanism Agnostic Low Plasticity Educational Realism by Freddie deBoer - Freddie's educational philosophy. People sort into persistent academic strata. Educational attainment is heavily determined by factors outside of school's control. The mechanism differences in academic ability is unknown. Social and political implications.
Kin Aesthetics Excommunicate Me From The Church Of Social Justice by Frances Lee - A SJ-insider's critical opinion of SJ. Fear of being impure. Original Sin. Reproducing colonial structures of power and domination within social justice. Everyday Feminism's belittling articles. More humility. Bringing humanity to everyone, even those who have been inhumane.
Study Of The Week To Remediate Or Not To Remediate by Freddie deBoer - Should low math proficiency students take remedial algebra or credit bearing statistics. The City University of New York ran an actual randomized study to test this. The study had pretty good controls. For example students were randomly assigned to three groups, participating professors taught one section of each group.
Should We Build Lots More Housing In San Francisco: Three Reasons People Disagree by Julia Galef - For each of the three reasons Julia describes multiple sub-reasons. More housing might not lower prices much. More housing won't help the poor. NIMBY objections might be legitimate.
Kenneth Arrow On The Welfare Economics Of Medical Care A Critical Assessment by Artir (Nintil) - "Kenneth Arrow wrote a paper in 1963, Uncertainty and the Welfare Economics of Medical Care. This paper tends to appear in debates regarding whether healthcare can be left to the market (like bread), or if it should feature heavy state involvement. Here I explain what the paper says, and to what extent it is true."
Thoughts On Doxxing by Ozy (Thing of Things) - CNN found the identity of the guy who made the video of Trump beating up CNN. They implied they would dox him if he continued being racist. Is doxxing him ok? What about doxxing someone who runs jailbait? Ozy discusses the practical effect of doxxing and unleashing hate mobs.
On The Seattle Minimum Wage Study Part 2 by Zvi Moshowitz - Several relevant links are included. Seattle's economic boom and worker composition changes are important factors. Zvi dives deep into the numbers and tries to resolve an apparent contradiction.
Radical Book Club The Decentralized Left by davidzhines (Status 451) - The nature of leftwing organizing and what righties can learn from it. An exposition of multiple books on radical left organization building. Major themes are "doing the work" and "decentralized leadership".
On The Seattle Minimum Wage Study Part 1 by Zvi Moshowitz - The claimed effect sizes are huge. Zvi's priors about the minimum wage. Detailed description of some of the paper's methods and how it handle potential issues. Discussion of the raw data. More to come in part 2.
===Misc:
Childcare II by Jeff Kaufman - A timeline of childcare for Jeff's two children. Methods: Staying at home, Daycare, Au pair, Nanny.
Easier Chess Problem by protokol2020 - How many pieces do you need to capture a black queen?
Book Review Mathematics For Computer Science by richard_reitz (lesswrong) - Why the text should be in the MIRI research guide. Intro. Prereqs. Detailed comparisons to similar texts. Complaints.
Information is Physical by Scott Aaronson - Is information is physical a contentful expression? Why 'physics is information' is tautological. A proposed definition. Double slit experiment. Observation in Quantum Mechanics. Information takes up a minimum amount of space. Entropy. Information has nowhere to go.
Book Review Working Effectively With Legacy Code By Michael C Feathers by Eli Bendersky - To improve code we must refactor, to refactor we have to test, making code testable may take heroic efforts. "The techniques described by the author are as terrible as the code they're up against."
The Ominouslier Roar Of The Bitcoin Wave by Artem and Venkat (ribbonfarm) - A video visualizing and audiolizing the bitcoin blockchain. A related dialogue.
From Monkey Neurons To The Meta Brain by Hal Morris (ribbonfarm) - Neurons that only fire in response to Jennifer Anniston. Mirror Neurons. Theory of Mind. The path from copying movement to human-level empathy. Infant development. Dreams as social simulator. Communicating with our models of other people. He rapidly accelerating and dangerous future. We need to keep our mind open to possibilities.
Newtonism Question by protokol2020 - Balancing Forces. Gravity problem.
Short Interview Writing by Tyler Cowen - Tyler Cowen's writing habits. Many concrete details such as when he writes and what program he uses. Some more general thoughts on writing such as Tyler's surprising answer to which are his favorite books on writing.
Unexpected by protokol2020 - Discussion of gaps between primes. "Say, that you have just sailed across some recordly wide composite lake and you are on a prime island again. What can you expect, how much wider will the next record lake be?"
Interacting With A Long Running Child Process In Python by Eli Bendersky - Using the subprocess module to run an http server. Solutions and analysis of common use cases. Lots of code.
4d Mate Problem by protokol2020 - How many queens do you need to get a checkmate in 4D chess.
The Destruction Of American Cuisine by Small Truths - America used to have a tremendous number of regional cuisines, most are dead. They were killed by supermarkets and frozen food. This has been costly both in terms of culture and health (antibiotic resistance, crop monoculture risk)
===Podcast:
Sally Satel On Organ Donation by EconTalk - "The challenges of increasing the supply of donated organs for transplantation and ways that public policy might increase the supply." Tax Credits. The ethics of donor compensation.
Podcast The World Needs Ai Researchers Heres How To Become One by 80,000 Hours - "OpenAI’s latest plans and research progress. Concrete Papers in AI Safety, which outlines five specific ways machine learning algorithms can act in dangerous ways their designers don’t intend – something OpenAI has to work to avoid. How listeners can best go about pursuing a career in machine learning and AI development themselves."
88 Must We Accept A Nuclear North Korea by Waking Up with Sam Harris - "Mark Bowden and the problem of a nuclear-armed North Korea."
Triggered by Waking Up with Sam Harris - "Sam Harris and Scott Adams debate the character and competence of President Trump."
Conversation Atul Gawande by Tyler Cowen - The marginal value of health care, AI progress in medicine, fear of genetic engineering, whether the checklist method applies to marriage, FDA regulation, surgical regulation, Michael Crichton and Stevie Wonder, wearables, what makes him weep, Knausgaard and Ferrante, why surgeons leave sponges in patients.
Nneka Jones Tapia by The Ezra Klein Show - The first psychologist to run a prison. 30% of inmates have diagnosed mental health problems. Mental heath view of the penal system, balancing punishment and treatment, responsibility versus mental instability, the tension between what we use jail for and what we should use jail for.
Tamar Haspel by EconTalk - "Why technology helps make some foods inexpensive, how animals are treated, the health of the honey bee, and whether eggs from your backyard taste any better than eggs at the grocery."
From Cells To Cities by Waking Up with Sam Harris - "Biological and social systems scale, the significance of fractals, the prospects of radically extending human life, the concept of “emergence” in complex systems, the importance of cities, the necessity for continuous innovation"
Inside The World Of Supertraining: Mark Bell by Tim Feriss - "Mark’s most important lessons for building strength. How to avoid injury and breakdown. Lesser-known training techniques that nearly everyone overlooks. How Mark became a millionaire by offering his gym memberships for free."
Eddie Izzard by The Ezra Klein Show - 27 marathons in 27 days, process for writing jokes, why he wants to run for parliament, inspiration from Al Franken's, borrowing confidence from his future self. What he learned as a street performer, routines are based on history and anthropology, World War I, 'cake or death?'. His gender identity, and how he integrated it into his act early on, etc.
Martha Nussbaum by EconTalk - "The tension between acquiring power and living a life of virtue. Topics discussed include Hamilton's relationship with Aaron Burr, Burr's complicated historical legacy, and the role of the humanities in our lives."
Rs 188 Robert Kurzban On Being Strategically Wrong by Rationally Speaking - Why Everyone (Else) is a Hypocrite." The "modular mind" hypothesis, and how it explains hypocrisy, self-deception, and other seemingly irrational features of human nature.
submitted by deluks917_ to slatestarcodex [link] [comments]

On Proof: A Confession about Satoshi?

The monster paragraph below, which is titled "On Proof", was taken from a website/blog I found while searching for a paper authored by CSW. The site I found appears to be some sort of confessional-tell-all CV authored by CSW to prove his identify. The text doesn't prove anything about CSW's work in bitcoin if true, but its possibly relevant to his ability to design bitcoin, his overall genius, and credibility. I have no position on whether Craig Wright is Satoshi at the moment.
I have no information about whether the wall-o-text contains anything true, who runs the site I found, or what the site is exactly. However, the text-wall contains plenty of info about CSW that can be cross-checked with official records.
In addition to the text (the wall is his, not mine), I've provided a link to the site, taken and an imgur album of my screen-captures. Some of the pictures show the browser tabs I had open when they were taken for time-stamping purposes.
WARNING. There is a downloader thing on the site, and I'm not sure about the funky URL. Be careful if you do visit.
http://bvde.cba.pl/9178.html (Text below)
http://imgur.com/a/NCfdt
It seems that I have to do this every couple years and each time it is generally worse as I have added to the list. In recent months I have been causing trouble again and as such there are always those who choose not to believe me or to engage in an attack on my character as a solution to not addressing the issue at hand. Let us start with career and that I am the VP of GICSR in Australia. Other than using an email address at GICSR, I am listed on the board as a director. Next, I am a trustee with the Uniting Church Trust Fund and am otherwise involved with the UC. That is me on page two of the funds newsletter where I had been accepted in the appointment. I have shaved, but it is still me in the photo. My role at Charles Sturt University is noted below and I have staff ID 11293457 if you want to actually check that. On certifications. I hold the three platinum certifications GSE, GSE-Malware and GSE-Compliance from GIAC. I will add my SANS/GIAC certs. I have more than any other person globally (not a boast, it is a fact). This is 37 Certs from GIAC alone. Click the link if you do not believe me. The answer is not just to believe this, validate it. All up, with Cisco and others I have over 100 certifications. Now, do you really care if you believe the total? Not really, and does it matter, not really. Some of those will start to disappear as I cannot maintain them and actually have a life anymore. I have 27 recertification’s next year that I will do at a cost of over $11,000. I will let some lapse. Degrees and more I am not going to cover all of my degrees any more. I will not discuss more than post graduate and a list of the papers associated with my doctoral work and I will simply cover those related to my profession here. I will not discuss my role as a lay pastor or theology degree other than face to face and only whit those I choose to discuss it with. There is enough to know I am involved with the Uniting Church and I am not here to convert people. If you are an atheist, that is your choice and I will not try to sway you at all. The thing is, atheism is also a belief. It is not and cannot be proven with science and hence is in a way also a religion even if in the negative. I do not wish to debate this (unless it is face to face, I like you and there is wine involved). If you are not happy with my post graduate qualifications, adding undergraduate qualifications right down to the associate degree level will add little. Then, does my having an Associate degree in Science (Organic Chemistry, Fuel sciences) add anything to my role in digital forensics and information security. If you really want to know what these are, there are old posts that searching will eventually uncover. As for the bio and claim that I am “a perpetual student with numerous post graduate degrees including an LLM specializing in international commercial law and ecommerce law, a Masters Degree in mathematical statistics from Newcastle as well as working on his 4th IT focused Masters degree (Masters in System Development) from Charles Sturt University where he lectures subjects in a Masters degree in digital forensics. He is writing his second doctorate, a PhD on the quantification of information system risk at CSU.” Charles Sturt University The masters degrees from CSU are: MMgmt(IT) – Masters of Management (IT) MNSA – Master of Network and System Admin MInfoSysSec – Master of Master Information Systems Security MSysDev – Master of System Development (nearly complete… I am just running out of subjects to do at the University. I even needed to take one where I was the author of the text just to have the credit points). Next year I complete my second doctorate. I also have two other Masters degrees not from CSU (the 4 they note in the link are those listed above), a Masters in Statistics (Newcastle AU) as well as a Masters in Law (Northumbria, UK). I am also doing the SANS Masters degree and have one more thing to complete this. That will give me 2 doctorates, 7 masters degrees and 8 other degrees. It is not too difficult to check that I am enrolled in the MSISE at the SANS Technology Institute (Master of Information Systems Engineering). Other than having presentations on the site (see this link) it would be crazy for me to state this. I have 37 GIAC certifications (which is most of either of the STI masters degrees. If I was to misrepresent my status at SANS/GIAC, the ethics policy means I will lose them all. So, first it is simple to actually check AND I have too much to lose in lying. I do this every couple years. Here is a link to a past time I had to do the same. Northumbria University I completed a Masters in Law in a UK based University. This is: LLM Northumbria – Master of Law (International Commerce Law, Ecommerce Law with commendation). PG Diploma in Law My dissertation was on "Internet Intermediary Liability". I received a commendation. If you need to check, I had Student Number: 05024288 Newcastle University MSTAT – Master of Statistics I was student number 3047661 at the University of Newcastle here in Australia. My thesis that I wrote to complete this degree was on “The homogeneity of Variances”. I analysed and tested many of the common statistical methods used in homogeneity tests in statistics (such as the Levene tests). Why? The links are associated with universities and others, so it is not too difficult to check me out. I am not stopping you. The only thing I do not wish to discuss openly is my role with the Uniting Church. My theological belief is one of the few things that remains personal and more than the stuff the church posts publically about me (which I attempt to minimise) I will not discuss. If you believe that my trying to maintain one personal and private thing in my life means I am lying, believe as you will. It does not impact my chosen career in information security and nor does it detract from this. Contrary to the believe structure some hold, one CAN be a doctor of the church as well as a scientist. Religion and Science do not overlap and nor should one seek to make them do so. We can never prove nor disprove the existence of any religion or other spiritual belief structure. This is why I also preach tolerance. I believe I am correct as far as I can be (and that is about zero as the human mind is too small to comprehend the infinite in any extent and any person who tells you differently is a liar or a fool). I comprehend and believe in my way, others in their own. Is Islam, Catholicism, Judaism etc right? Yes and no. Am I right, yes and know. Basically, we see a small aspect of the infinite and that is all we ever will. We can be right and wrong at the same time and will never be completely right as we cannot hold the concept of an infinite in our heads (and I have studied large number theory). In a way, I hate having to do this each few years. In this, I have scratched the surface of what I have done and that leaves many in disbelief. That stated, I fail in humility for this as well as other reasons. On Sanity I guess that the final aspect of this is on sanity. I have been accused of being insane for doing all I do. To take a quote from one of my doctoral supervisors: “Craig, you have a doctorate, why on earth would you want to go through this again. It is insane.” I love study. I can do it and I am good at it. I do not need to do formal study, but I like it. I enjoy the structure. I like the process and it means that I do more. I do not watch sport (I do play sport but there is a distinction) and I do not watch TV. Formal study is MY form of relaxation. To those people (usually without degrees) who keep attacking me and saying I cannot have done this, I offer you the chance to validate all of it. Now, the answer is that you can do something. Instead of engaging in an exercise designed to cut down tall poppies and to attack those who have done something, why not do something yourself? I will (and have in the past) helped others. I will do this for nearly anyone (none of us are not perfect and that includes me). There are ways that anyone can study these days. In fact, I am more than happy to help all I can to have people achieve this. Instead of attacking the character of others you see as frightening (and this really is what this is about), how about you spend the time doing a qualification yourself? Really, my email is public. I keep offering, instead of attacking the accomplishments of others, add to your own. I offer this and from time to time, people take me up on it. This is, I offer to help others improve their education. Not for money, not for fame, but as I want to have a better aware and education world. In this, I also benefit as a more educated (practically) world is one that will have fewer (though always some) issues and which could be more tolerant. Certification and membership numbers A limited subset of certifications I hold is listed below: CISSP # 47302 (ICS)2 Certified Information Systems Security Professional ISSMP # 47302 (ICS)2 Information Systems Security – Management Professional ISSAP # 47302 (ICS)2 Information Systems Security – Architecture Professional CISA # 0542911 IS Audit and Control Association – Certified Information Systems Auditor CISM # 0300803 IS Audit and Control Association – Certified Information Security Manager CCE # 480 ISFCE – Certified Computer Examiner ISSPCS # 051 International Systems Security Professional Certification Scheme MCSA # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (Mail) MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (Security) MCDBA # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Database Administrator MIEEE # 87028913 Member IEEE AFAIM # PM133844 Associate Fellow Aust Inst. Management (lapsed now as I have been culling memberships – they cost too much to maintain) MACS # 3015822 Senior Member Aust Computer Society GIAC… NOT ALLL GSE-Compliance #0001 [Platinum] GIAC Security Compliance (GSE-Compliance) GSEC # 10506 [Gold] GIAC Security Essentials Certification (GSEC) GCIH # 06896 [Silver] GIAC Certified Incident Handler GCIA # 02913 [Silver] GIAC Certified Intrusion Analyst GCFW # 01891 [Silver] GIAC Certified Firewall Analyst GCWN # 01234 [Silver] GIAC Certified Windows Security Administrator GAWN # 00894 [Silver] GIAC Assessing Wireless Networks GCUX # 00587 [Silver] GIAC Certified UNIX Security Administrator GNET # GIAC .Net GSLC # GIAC Security Leadership Certification GHTQ # 00368 [Silver] GIAC Cutting Edge Hacking Techniques G7799 # 0039 [GOLD] GIAC Certified ISO-17799 Specialist (G7799) GCFA # 0265 [GOLD] GIAC Certified Forensics Analyst (GCFA) GSNA # 0571 [GOLD] GIAC Systems and Network Auditor (GSNA) GSAE # 00141 [Silver] GIAC Security Audit Essentials (GSAE) GLEG # 0006 [GOLD] GIAC Legal Issues (GLEG) GLEG Incorporates GIAC Business Law and Computer Security (GBLC) GLEG Incorporates GIAC Contracting for Data Security (GCDS) GLIT GLEG Incorporates GIAC Legal Issues in Information Technologies (GLIT) GLFR # 0016 GIAC Law of Fraud (GLFR) GREM # 0586 GIAC Reverse Engineering Malware (GREM) GPCI # 0086 GIAC Payment Card Industry (GPCI) GSPA # 0101 GIAC Security Policy and Awareness (GSPA) GLDR # 0101 GIAC Leadership (GLDR) GWAS # 0535 GIAC Web Application Security (GWAS) GIPS # 0036 GIAC Intrusion Prevention (GIPS) SSP-MPA # 0416 Stay Sharp Program – Mastering Packet Analysis (SSP-MPA) SSP-GHD # 0246 Stay Sharp Program – Google Hacking and Defense (SSP-GHD) SSP-DRAP # 0171 Stay Sharp Program – Defeating Rogue Access Points (SSP-DRAP) Papers / Publications: Peer Reviewed Papers Right now, I have a further 8 papers in peer review. The following are all accepted and/or published. 2012 (Accepted) 1. Wright, C. (2012, February). Hacktivism, terror and the state: The Importance of Effectively Enforcing Cyber Security Legislation. Paper to be presented at the 10th Anniversary National Security Australia Conference. 2011 2. Wright, C. (2011, December) Who pays for a security violation? An assessment into the cost of lax security, negligence and risk, a glance into the looking glass. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. . 3. Wright, C. (2011, December) Current issues and liability facing Internet Intermediaries. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 4. Wright, C. (2011, December) Criminal Specialization as a corollary of Rational Choice. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. Wright, C. (2011, December) A preamble into aligning Systems engineering and Information security risk measures. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 5. Wright, C. & Via, T. (2011, December) Modeling System Audit as a Sequential test with Discovery as a Failure Time Endpoint. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 6. Wright, C. (2011) “Exploiting format Strings with Python” Hakin9 7. Wright, C. (2011) “More Exploits with Python” Hakin9 8. Wright, C. (2011, September)Of Black Swans, Platypii and Bunyips. The outlier and normal incident in risk management. Paper presented at CACS2011 Australia. 9. Wright, C. & Zia, T. (2011, July)Compliance or Security, what cost? (Poster)” Australasian Conference on Information Security and Privacy. 10. Wright, C. (2011) “A comparative study of attacks against Corporate IIS and Apache Web Servers” Sans Technology Inst, USA 11. Wright, C. (2011) “Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” Republished and extended Paper, Sans Technology Inst, USA 12. Wright, C. (2011) “Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” Republished and extended Paper, Sans Technology Inst, USA 13. Wright, C. & Zia T (2011)”Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” CISIS Spain 14. Wright, C. & Zia T (2011)”A Quantitative Analysis into the Economics of Correcting Software Bugs” CISIS Spain 2010 15. Wright, C. (2010) “Software, Vendors and Reputation: an analysis of the dilemma in creating secure software” Intrust 2010 China 16. Wright, C. & Zia T (2010) “The Economics of Developing Security Embedded Software” SecAU Australia 17. Wright, C. (2010) “The not so Mythical IDS Man-Month: Or Brooks and the rule of information security” ISSRE USA 18. Wright, C. (2010) “Packer Analysis Report – Debugging and unpacking the NsPack 3.4 and 3.7 packer.” Sans Technology Inst, USA 2009 19. Wright, C. (2009) “Effective Patch Management – Saving Time and Getting Better Security” MISTI USA 20. Wright, C. (2009) “Database Auditing” Testing Experience, Germany 21. Wright, C. (2009) “SaaS Security” MISTI USA 22. CISecurity (Multiple) (2009) CIS BIND Benchmarks” Centre For Internet Security, USA 2008 23. Wright C, Kleiman D & Sundhar R.S. (2008) “Overwriting Hard Drive Data: The Great Wiping Controversy” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Springer Berlin / Heidelberg) 24. Wright, C. (2008) “Detecting Hydan: Statistical Methods For Classifying The Use Of Hydan Based Stegonagraphy In Executable Files” Sans Technology Inst USA 25. Wright, C. (2008) “Using Neural Networks” Google 26. Wright, C. (2008) “Ensuring secure data transfer and data sharing” DQ Asia Pacific 27. Wright, C. (2008) “Record and Document Destruction in a Digital World” IT Security World, USA 28. Wright, C. (2008) “Managing Security in a Global Company” IT Security World, USA 29. Wright, C. (2008) “A Quick and Nasty overview of finding TrueCrypt Volumes” Sans Technology Institute 30. Wright, C. (2008) “Exploring Data Visualisation” Strategic Data Mining 31. Wright, C. (2008) “Statistical Methods to Determine the Authenticity of Data” CACS2008, Au 32. Wright, C. (2008) “Text Data Mining, the future of Digital Forensics” Hex Journal USA 33. Wright, C. (2008) “Compliance, law and Metrics: What you need to meet and how you prove it” SANS ACT 34. Wright, C. (2008) “Current Issues in DNS” Sans Technology Inst, USA 35. Wright, C. (2008) “Advanced Methods to Remotely Determine Application Versions” NS2008 LV, USA 36. Wright, C. (2008) “An in-depth review of the security features inherent in Firefox 3.0 Compared to IE 8.0” iDefense, USA 2007 37. Wright, C. (2007) “The Problem With Document Destruction” ITAudit, Vol 10. 10 Aug 2007, The IIA, USA 38. Wright, C. (2007) “Requirements for Record Keeping and Document Destruction in a Digital World” Sans Technology Inst, USA 39. Wright, C. (2007) “Electronic Contracting in an Insecure World” Sans Technology Inst, USA 40. Wright, C. (2007) “The Problem with Document Destruction” IRMA UK (Republished) 41. Wright, C. (2007) “Ethical Attacks miss the point!” System Control Journal ISACA 42. Wright, C. (2007) “Where Vulnerability Testing fails” System Control Journal ISACA 43. Wright, C. (2007) “Application, scope and limits of Letters of Indemnity in regards to the International Law of Trade” Internal Publication, BDO Aug 2007 44. Wright, C. (2007) “UCP 500, fizzle or bang” Internal Publication, BDO July 2007 2006 45. Wright, C. (2006) “Port Scanning A violation of Property rights” Hakin9 46. Wright, C. (2006) “A Taxonomy of Information Systems Audits, Assessments and Reviews” SANS Technology Inst USA 47. Wright, C. (2006) “RISK & Risk Management” 360 Security Summit AU 48. Wright, C. (2006) “A QUANTITATIVE TIME SERIES ANALYSIS OF MALWARE AND VULNERABILITY TRENDS” Ruxcon AU 2005 49. Wright, C. (2005) “Analysis of a serial based digital voice recorder” Published 2006 SANS Technology Inst USA 50. Wright, C. (2005) “Implementing an Information Security Management System (ISMS) Training process” SANS Darling Harbour AU 51. Wright, C. (2005) “Beyond Vulnerability Scans — Security Considerations for Auditors” ITAudit, The IIA, USA 52. Wright, C. (2005) “PCI Payment Card Industry Facts” Retail Industry journal, July 2005 2001 53. Multiple Authors (1999) “Windows NT Security Step by Step” SANS Technology Inst USA 2000 54. Ashbury A & Wright, C. (2000) “DNS Security in Australia” Net Security, June 2000. 1999 55. Wright, C. (1999) “A Comparative analysis of Firewalls” in “The Internet Hot Sheet” ATT Sept 1999 Books / Book Chapters 1. Wright, C. (2008) “0123456789The IT Regulatory and Standards Compliance Handbook: How to Survive Information Systems Audit and Assessments0123456789” Syngress USA 2. Litchko, J; Lang, D; Hennell , C; Wright, C & Linden, M V (2011) ““0123456789Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP(R)-ISSMP(R) CBK0123456789” CRC Press, ISC2 USA 3. Kleiman, D; Wright, C; Varsalone, V& Clinton, T (2007) “0123456789The Official CHFI Study Guide0123456789” (Exam 312-49) (Paperback)” Syngress, USA 2007 This book is used as a text for ITE-513 at Charles Sturt University 4. Multiple Authors (2009) “0123456789Cisco Router and Switch Forensics: Investigating and Analyzing Malicious Network Activity0123456789”, Syngress Press 5. Multiple Authors (2009) “0123456789Mobile Malware Attacks and Defense0123456789”, Syngress Press 6. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Check Point NGX R65 Security0123456789” Syngress, USA This book is used as a text at Charles Sturt University 7. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Mobile Malicious Code0123456789” Syngress, USA 8. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Best Forensic Book0123456789” Syngress, USA In 2012 the following book will be published by Taylor Francis Academic press: SCADA Security. I am the author of the Forensic chapter Chapter 16: Forensics Management
submitted by veintiuno to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

AttributeError: 'datetime.datetime' object has no attribute 'timestamp'

Please Help - I keep receiving the following Traceback Error:
Currently Running Python 2.0
I'm attempting to utilize Python's Plotly library to display an infographic illustrating bitcoin prices. I've tried importing datetime at the top of my code but this doesn't appear to solve the problem.
Traceback (most recent call last): File "project_one.py", line 165, in crypto_price_df = get_crypto_data(coinpair) File "project_one.py", line 155, in get_crypto_data json_url = base_polo_url.format(poloniex_pair, start_date.timestamp(), end_date.timestamp(), pediod) AttributeError: 'datetime.datetime' object has no attribute 'timestamp'
import numpy as np import pandas as pd from pandas import Series, DataFrame, Panel import matplotlib.pyplot as plt plt.style.use('fivethirtyeight') import seaborn as sns import sklearn as sk import scipy as sp import os import pickle import quandl import datetime import plotly.plotly as py import plotly.graph_objs as go import plotly.figure_factory as ff from plotly import tools from plotly.offline import iplot, init_notebook_mode from IPython.display import display, HTML init_notebook_mode(connected=True) def get_quandl_data(quandl_id): cache_path = '{}.pkl'.format(quandl_id).replace('/','-') try: f = open(cache_path, 'rb') df = pickle.load(f) print('Loaded {} from cache'.format(quandl_id)) except (OSError, IOError) as e: print('Downloading {} from Quandl'.format(quandl_id)) df = quandl.get(quandl_id, returns="pandas") df.to_pickle(cache_path) print('Cached {} at {}'.format(quandl_id, cache_path)) return df btc_usd_price_kraken = get_quandl_data('BCHARTS/KRAKENUSD') exchanges = ['COINBASE','BITSTAMP','ITBIT'] exchange_data = {} exchange_data['KRAKEN'] = btc_usd_price_kraken for exchange in exchanges: exchange_code = 'BCHARTS/{}USD'.format(exchange) btc_exchange_df = get_quandl_data(exchange_code) exchange_data[exchange] = btc_exchange_df def merge_dfs_on_column(dataframes, labels, col): series_dict = {} for index in range(len(dataframes)): series_dict[labels[index]] = dataframes[index][col] return pd.DataFrame(series_dict) btc_usd_datasets = merge_dfs_on_column(list(exchange_data.values()), list(exchange_data.keys()), 'Weighted Price') def df_scatter(df, title, seperate_y_axis=False, y_axis_label='', scale='linear', initial_hide=False): label_arr = list(df) series_arr = list(map(lambda col: df[col], label_arr)) layout = go.Layout( title=title, legend=dict(orientation="h"), xaxis=dict(type='date'), yaxis=dict( title=y_axis_label, showticklabels= not seperate_y_axis, type=scale ) ) y_axis_config = dict( overlaying='y', showticklabels=False, type=scale ) visibility = 'visible' if initial_hide: visibility = 'legendonly' trace_arr = [] for index, series in enumerate(series_arr): trace = go.Scatter( x=series.index, y=series, name=label_arr[index], visible=visibility ) if seperate_y_axis: trace['yaxis'] = 'y{}'.format(index + 1) layout['yaxis{}'.format(index + 1)] = y_axis_config trace_arr.append(trace) fig = go.Figure(data=trace_arr, layout=layout) py.plot(fig) df_scatter(btc_usd_datasets, 'Bitcoin Price (USD) By Exchange') btc_usd_datasets.replace(0, np.nan, inplace=True) df_scatter(btc_usd_datasets, 'Bitcoin Price (USD) By Exchange') btc_usd_datasets['avg_btc_price_usd'] = btc_usd_datasets.mean(axis=1) btc_trace = go.Scatter(x=btc_usd_datasets.index, y=btc_usd_datasets['avg_btc_price_usd']) py.plot([btc_trace]) def get_json_data(json_url, cache_path): try: f = open(cache_path, 'rb') df = pickle.load(f) print('Loaded {} from cache'.format(json_url)) except (OSError, IOError) as e: print('Downloading {}'.format(json_url)) df = pd.read_json(json_url) df.to_pickle(cache_path) print('Cached {} at {}'.format(json_url, cache_path)) return df base_polo_url = 'https://poloniex.com/public? command=returnChartData¤cyPair={}&start= {}&end={}&period={}' start_date = datetime.datetime.strptime('2015-01-01', '%Y-%m-%d') end_date = datetime.datetime.now() pediod = 86400 # pull daily data (86,400 seconds per day) def get_crypto_data(poloniex_pair): json_url = base_polo_url.format(poloniex_pair, start_date.timestamp(), end_date.timestamp(), pediod) data_df = get_json_data(json_url, poloniex_pair) data_df = data_df.set_index('date') return data_df altcoins = ['ETH','LTC','XRP','ETC','STR','DASH','SC','XMR','XEM'] altcoin_data = {} for altcoin in altcoins: coinpair = 'BTC_{}'.format(altcoin) crypto_price_df = get_crypto_data(coinpair) altcoin_data[altcoin] = crypto_price_df 
submitted by bullybear17 to learnpython [link] [comments]

Fairly new, code optimization help :(

I'm fairly new to python, and coding in general. I wrote a small script with the help of a friend to pull an API, and calculate my crypto holdings.
Limiting the GET to 1, is trivial, its re-writing the rest thats giving me a hard time. I've been working on this for the last 2 days with varying results, but no success. The following is the current code that uses a GET for each coin My end goal is to use 1 get.
URL = "https://api.coinmarketcap.com/v1/ticke" coinData = requests.get(URL).json() 
Current Code Below
import requests import json coins = {"ethereum":1.8387, "bitcoin":.1, "litecoin":6, "monero":3, "siacoin":7,"omisego":1.168,"golem-network-tokens":7,"ripple":4,"digibyte":18,"neo":1.251,"bytecoin-bcn":20, "signatum":1} coinStats = [] totalStats = [] totalCoinValue = 0.0 for coin in coins: URL = "https://api.coinmarketcap.com/v1/ticke" + coin data = requests.get(URL).json() name = data[0]["name"] price = format(float(data[0]["price_usd"]), '.2f') currentPrice = (float(price) * coins[coin]) coinStats.append({name:price}) totalStats.append({name:format(currentPrice, '.2f')}) totalCoinValue += currentPrice #print(coins["monero"]) print(coinStats) print(totalStats) print(format(totalCoinValue, '.2f')) print(json.dumps(coinStats, indent=1)) 
any help would be great
submitted by demesm to learnpython [link] [comments]

Parsing JSON data with 4 top level fields

I am parsing JSON data from this url. The JSON data is formatted like this
Each of the four categories has its own top level field, containing a list of lists. How can I parse each of these categories into their own lists in python? For example, I'll have a market_cap_by_available_supply list that contains information identical to what's in the JSON file
full code
import time import requests import json r = requests.get("https://graphs2.coinmarketcap.com/currencies/bitcoin/") marketCap = [] price_btc = [] price_usd = [] volume_usd = [] market_info = [] print(r.text) 
I tried parsing a field like this, but it throws the following error
#for data in d: #print(data["market_cap_by_available_supply"]) TypeError: byte indices must be integers or slices, not str 
Thanks!
EDIT: Best solution was to parse it like this
r = requests.get("https://graphs2.coinmarketcap.com/currencies/bitcoin/") response_data = r.json() for data in response_data["market_cap_by_available_supply"]: print(data) print("market cap done") for data in response_data["price_btc"]: print(data) print("price btc done") 
submitted by rektourRick to learnprogramming [link] [comments]

[For Hire] I'm Shackra, your gentle web data miner for all your information needs, I charge per mined record!

Hello, I'm shackra !
As a freelancer I have worked several times for clients interested in mining information from websites and structuring such data for later processing, now as I have grow professionally and updated my stack for this particular field I would like to offer my services as data miner.
Usually, data miners often charge per time consumed for a particular project or per the complexity of the site to mine, in my case you will receive a flat fee based on the number of records mined from the site. A record is a row of data divided by columns which is a structure that eases data processing by other tools. The mining process is done in a way that is gentle and respectful to the website.

What to do to request my service?

If you are interested, please send me a PM filling the following form, I will review the site and be back to you in a couple of hours (Just take into account that I may be sleeping if you contact from the other side of the planet :D):
- Website's URL entry point, where the mining should start!: - Credentials if required, keywords to search if needed, etc: - Steps, or *what does the miner need to do to find the data you have interest in?*: 1. Visit URL inside entry point, or search for keyword, etc. 2. Find this particular element in the page (**Be sure to provide a screenshot with the element highlighted and include the URL of that page too for further examination by me**), store as `FieldA`, etc. 3. Go to the next page, or visit the other entry point, or mine this other particular element in the page and store it as `FieldB`, etc. 4. Repeat all steps until ... (This is implied actually) - Under which formats you want receive the results?, available options are: `CSV`, `TSV`, `JSON`. 

What's next after contacting you, pal?

I will review your request and send you a notice regarding the project, if accepted I will handcraft the miner for the website and you will get another notice when the miner is started, 24 hours later I will tell you how many records the miner has collected from the website and then you can buy as many records as you want or wait a little more and let the miner do its job :D.

⚠ Terms and conditions ⚠

Past jobs (Most recents on top)

Price and payment options!

Each record costs 0.012 USD$ :), the price remains the same no matter how many columns a record is composed of. If the website cannot provide 2500 records, a fixed price will be use instead, which is 30 USD$.
The delivery of the records will happen after the invoice is 100% cancelled. If the total data is more than 1MiB compressed with 7zip I will try to deliver it by email otherwise Dropbox will be use.

Final words...

Please don't hesitate to make questions in the comments. Sending a job request does not entail either part have some sort of compromise with doing the project, thus don't be shy contacting me in private! :).
submitted by shackra to forhire [link] [comments]

[For hire] I'm Shackra, your gentle web data miner for all your information needs, I charge per mined record!

Hello, I'm shackra !
As a freelancer I have worked several times for clients interested in mining information from websites and structuring such data for later processing, now as I have grow professionally and updated my stack for this particular field I would like to offer my services as data miner.
Usually, data miners often charge per time consumed for a particular project or per the complexity of the site to mine, in my case you will receive a flat fee based on the number of records mined from the site. A record is a row of data divided by columns which is a structure that eases data processing by other tools. The mining process is done in a way that is gentle and respectful to the website.

What to do to request my service?

If you are interested, please send me a PM filling the following form, I will review the site and be back to you in a couple of hours (Just take into account that I may be sleeping if you contact from the other side of the planet :D):
- Website's URL entry point, where the mining should start!: - Credentials if required, keywords to search if needed, etc: - Steps, or *what does the miner need to do to find the data you have interest in?*: 1. Visit URL inside entry point, or search for keyword, etc. 2. Find this particular element in the page (**Be sure to provide a screenshot with the element highlighted and include the URL of that page too for further examination by me**), store as `FieldA`, etc. 3. Go to the next page, or visit the other entry point, or mine this other particular element in the page and store it as `FieldB`, etc. 4. Repeat all steps until ... (This is implied actually) - Under which formats you want receive the results?, available options are: `CSV`, `TSV`, `JSON`. 

What's next after contacting you, pal?

I will review your request and send you a notice regarding the project, if accepted I will handcraft the miner for the website and you will get another notice when the miner is started, 24 hours later I will tell you how many records the miner has collected from the website and then you can buy as many records as you want or wait a little more and let the miner do its job :D.

⚠ Terms and conditions ⚠

Past jobs (Most recents on top)

Price and payment options!

Each record costs 0.012 USD$ :). If the website cannot provide 2500 records, a fixed price will be use instead, which is 30 USD$.
The delivery of the records will happen after the invoice is 100% cancelled. If the total data is more than 1MiB compressed with 7zip I will try to deliver it by email otherwise Dropbox will be use.

Final words...

Please don't hesitate to make questions in the comments. Sending a job request does not entail either part have some sort of compromise with doing the project, thus don't be shy contacting me in private! :).
submitted by shackra to forhire [link] [comments]

[For Hire] I'm Shackra, your gentle web data miner for all your information needs, I charge per mined record!

Hello, I'm shackra !
As a freelancer I have worked several times for clients interested in mining information from websites and structuring such data for later processing, now as I have grow professionally and updated my stack for this particular field I would like to offer my services as data miner.
Usually, data miners often charge per time consumed for a particular project or per the complexity of the site to mine, in my case you will receive a flat fee based on the number of records mined from the site. A record is a row of data divided by columns which is a structure that eases data processing by other tools. The mining process is done in a way that is gentle and respectful to the website.

What to do to request my service?

If you are interested, please send me a PM filling the following form, I will review the site and be back to you in a couple of hours (Just take into account that I may be sleeping if you contact from the other side of the planet :D):
- Website's URL entry point, where the mining should start!: - Credentials if required, keywords to search if needed, etc: - Steps, or *what does the miner need to do to find the data you have interest in?*: 1. Visit URL inside entry point, or search for keyword, etc. 2. Find this particular element in the page (**Be sure to provide a screenshot with the element highlighted and include the URL of that page too for further examination by me**), store as `FieldA`, etc. 3. Go to the next page, or visit the other entry point, or mine this other particular element in the page and store it as `FieldB`, etc. 4. Repeat all steps until ... (This is implied actually) - Under which formats you want receive the results?, available options are: `CSV`, `TSV`, `JSON`. 

What's next after contacting you, pal?

I will review your request and send you a notice regarding the project, if accepted I will handcraft the miner for the website and you will get another notice when the miner is started, 24 hours later I will tell you how many records the miner has collected from the website and then you can buy as many records as you want or wait a little more and let the miner do its job :D.

⚠ Terms and conditions ⚠

Past jobs (Most recents on top)

Price and payment options!

Each record costs 0.012 USD$ :), the price remains the same no matter how many columns a record is composed of. If the website cannot provide 2500 records, a fixed price will be use instead, which is 30 USD$.
The delivery of the records will happen after the invoice is 100% cancelled. If the total data is more than 1MiB compressed with 7zip I will try to deliver it by email otherwise Dropbox will be use.

Final words...

Please don't hesitate to make questions in the comments. Sending a job request does not entail either part have some sort of compromise with doing the project, thus don't be shy contacting me in private! :).
submitted by shackra to forhire [link] [comments]

Original project on hold, what now? (long)

First Post: (You are here.)
Part Two: Filesystems and Data Protection
Part Three: Networking and Security (Pending)
So, I've got my Pi (Model B, 512 RAM) sitting in my homemade LEGO case with detachable 5 watt fan. Power supply is a solid 2.1 amp outlet-to-USB adapter. My SD is a Sandisk micro SDHC in an adapter; 16 gigabytes. The NOOBS installer works fine. All of the ported distros work fine. I bought both codecs. I have a 32 GB USB stick, a WIFI adapter, and everything is working perfectly. Everything runs off the one 5 volt, 2 amp adapter in the wall. No powered hubs, no stack of boxes next to it, nothing. It's a clean and compact setup.
So what's the problem? Well...
The project that I had in mind when I bought the thing was a simple one. I wanted (and want) to use the Pi to make a modest podcast downloader and NAS/samba server. I've gotten both working. All is well. So, what's the problem if the project is already done? Storage space. I checked my main computer's drive, and discovered that I have well over 100 GB of nothing but podcasts. Music is another 40 or so. Television shows and movies are about 50 GB. Artwork is about 70 GB. Other documents and images aren't that much. Remember my 32 GB flash drive? Don't even ask me how big my entire Humble Bundle collection would be, or Steam games and backups. Yeah... that's not going to work.
So my options are to either get an external drive that (A) won't suck all the power and kill my Pi, (B) is reliable to both stay on 24/7 and keep my data safe for years, and (C) doesn't cost a billion dollars; -OR- I can find another project for my Raspberry Pi.
I've looked into USB SSDs, but they're very pricy, don't have much storage space, and all full size external drives seem to require more power than the Pi would put out. They make 128 gigabyte flash drives, but those tend to be very expensive and are generally reviewed as failing often. If anyone has experience running an external USB SSD on their Pi without a powered hub, let me know. I'll get a hub if I need one, but I really do not want to.
So below is an improvised list of the ideas I've had, and why I haven't done them. I'm hoping that if, at the very least I don't get any good suggestions from you fine folks, that you will get a few good ideas from me. If anyone wants me to re-write this list into an organized and more complete format, then just ask. Maybe we could make a giant list of project ideas.
Anyway, I tossed around some projects in my head: (edited for readability)
  • So I thought about an emulation station. But, no. I already have an ollllld PSP (phat 1001) that I can lay in bed with and play all my old games on.
  • I thought about a wireless speaker for my computer, or a random Internet radio box. Neither of those are very useful to me though. I have this thing called a MP3 player with FM radio, plus a slow Internet connection.
  • Then I thought I could make a media center with OpenELEC, but since I don't have any networked media storage, and can watch everything I want from my computer, that's not very useful either.
  • Next on the list could be an IRC server, but I've no one to chat with on my network, and random strangers getting past my router and firewall is less than comfortable to me.
  • How about a Minecraft server! Offload some of the work to my Pi and enjoy a slightly better framerate on my main machine! Plus it's always on, so it's like the world is real in a sense. But the FPS boost wouldn't be that great, the chunks would load slower, and I don't play much Minecraft anymore anyway.
  • An automatic backup server? Again, no large storage for the Pi.
  • A general downloader? So no room for my music, no podcasts, no games (all legal). What exactly would I be downloading? Say I'm on my main computer, go to gutenberg.org, see a book I want to read, copy the URL, SSH into my Pi and 'wget' it. Then I use samba to connect my main machine to my Pi so I can re-download the book that I downloaded? Even if it was all automatic, what's the point when I ultimately want the copy on my main machine, have no reason to share the books across my home network, and don't need tons of disk space to store it?
  • A dedicated firewall box? That's an interesting idea, but I'm afraid I don't know much about how that would work, am in another room as the modem, and I already have a DD-WRT router taking care of things.
  • A dedicated social media thingy? I don't use any social media. I suppose reddit might count, but no chat programs, no G+ or facebook, no Twitter or StumbleUpon.
  • A feed aggregator? Most of my RSS feeds are web comics that would be better suited to viewing on my main machine. Besides, it really doesn't take that long to update them.
  • An educational platform? Learn python perhaps? My geek cred would go through the roof, certainly, but if I may quote... "Ain't nobody got time for that!". Anyway, my computer would serve equally well, I'd think.
  • Home automation? I live in a small apartment and have no knowledge of wiring, much less of complex electronics and custom coding. This should be a fun, cheap, and a small project for me, not a DIY renovation 'just because'.
  • Build a robot? See above.
  • Groovy homemade alarm clock? Now that's a great 'Plan C' for me. Simple, fun, and unless the power goes out, reliable. One power outage and my Pi's clock gets reset; not a great alarm clock. I suppose I could set a script to sync the time via NTP, but that assumes the modem and wireless router are both working and connected to the Internet after the power cuts back on.
  • Security cam? Cool, but I don't need anything like that.
  • Boodler box? This could be really nice to fall asleep to. I hear that the Boodler software makes very good artificial ambient sounds. But that seems like a waste of a perfectly good Pi, to only use it for an hour each day, if that. I know it could do other things during the daytime, but what? Finding something useful for it is the whole point here.
  • A text-to-speech book reader? My Kindle does that quite nicely, and is easier to carry around.
  • Some sort of tricky pseudo-URL setup that redirects traffic for example.com to a server on the Pi? Another interesting idea, but I have no use for that sort of thing. Who am I going to practical joke on my network? Me? Now, I suppose there's an application for extreme security. You set the outgoing URLs and IP addresses that you will allow on your network, and everything else gets sent to a black hole. It would make it hard for malware on any device on your network to call home, or even for a hacker to get feedback from your machines. But it would be a pain in the ass for normal household Internet usage.
  • Similarly, a Tor router or personal email server? No need.
  • Anything mobile or battery powered? No mobile applications needed or wanted; no batteries required.
  • A SMS forwarder? My phone doesn't get decent Internet connections, or have an email application, or a sane data plan, so getting emails or chat logs via SMS would be cool. But again, I do no chatting, and emails over SMS would be painful come bill day.
  • A personal web server? Don't want one.
  • An OwnCloud equivalent of Firefox's sync? Basically I would copy my Firefox profile to the Pi, set it in a samba share, and have all of my machines softlink to it. A very cool idea, but kind of flawed. There wouldn't be any protection from multiple computers writing to the profile at the same time. Also, I only have one computer. Well, I have a laptop, but that's a separated thing.
  • Maybe an index? It wouldn't actually hold any files, but it could keep an automatic inventory of what music, movies, and games I have. Neat, but not very useful.
  • A key? I configure my main machine to check the local network for any computer named "raspi" or something, and make it automatically shut down if there isn't one? I'm not that tin-foily yet. It also assumes that wifi works on all devices involved. If a storm fries the router, then my main machine is locked down until I get a new router and set it up...without a computer.
  • A purely essentials backup? Nothing but my important documents, browser profiles, and the like? What, is my Pi reduced to a glorified USB stick now? Use it once every two months and have it gather dust the rest of the time?
  • A local network VOIP? Our phones have built-in intercom functions.
  • A Internet-connected VOIP system? Now that would be interesting. I have no one techie enough to be able to call me on it though.
  • Bitcoin miner? Surely you jest.
  • A Tripwire log storage thing? An intrusion detection module for the entire network? I'm not knowledgeable enough to set that up properly. Nor would I know what to do if I caught a malicious hacker. If I was and did, I still don't really have a need for it.
  • An entropy generator? Use things like a USB microphone, network traffic, the GPU traffic, etc., to make random numbers that are extremely hard to predict. Cool, but I don't need that sort of thing.
  • Voice automation. There's nothing I want to automate vocally. Plus, even commercial voice automation systems aren't that good. I certainly don't want to use Google's service for my always on, personal, home usage.
  • A virtual pet? No monitor and keyboard, just some sort of critter 'lives' on my Pi, and I talk to it with a USB microphone and stuff? That sounds like a fun idea, but it would probably get stale really quickly. Besides, I know of no software that would do that. I could see a market in the future where small devices run pet AIs that people can interact with. Maybe I could make that happen and be a gazillionare. Maybe you could make that happen and just send me a nice check for giving you the idea. Seriously though. That sounds like a cool concept, but I know even less of programing, electronics, and AI theory, than I of quantum horse breeding.
  • Wardriv... Um, Warsitting? Log things like wifi spots, encryption schemes used, signal strength and clarity, etc.. I could even sniff signals to figure out people's encryption keys. Why would I want to do any of that though?
  • Give CPU cycles to some project like protein folding research? The Pi wouldn't be very valuable for that, I don't think. Also, my slow Internet connection.
  • Learn electrical engineering and play with the GPIO? Make something with LEDs? That's something I would enjoy doing, but I don't have the money or time to mess with that right now. Call this "Plan H".
  • Have a sensitive information (bank, email, online shopping) machine that I don't need to worry about? Another very good idea. Boring, but good. I'd rather find something fun to work on first though.
  • A guest computer? That wouldn't be very fun for me. I'd set it up once, then store it away until someone comes over to play on the Internet? That's boring.
  • A seeding torrent box for Linux ISOs? Good, geeky, and kind of fun. The problem is that I have 30 KB (max) upload, and AT&T as my ISP.
  • Anything? A porn machine? While tempting, and probably a good idea for separating work and play... I'm fine, thanks. Besides: "Hey, neat little box. Is that a computer? What does it do?" Yeah...
So, as you can see, I'm having trouble coming up with a fun project to do. I'm not just getting a Pi without any idea and begging for an instruction book. I had a goal and even got it set up. I just kind of forgot to check how much storage I needed.
So, if anyone has any ideas of things to do with a single Raspberry Pi, please share. I'm at a loss. I'm just been goofing around and trying out different operating systems on it. I'd hate for this thing to go to waste.

UPDATE:

Well, I finally just bit the bullet and got an external HDD for my Pi. I figured that I needed to get one anyway, since I'm running out of room on my main machine. So I might as well put my hundreds of gigs of audio on the Pi's drive once it arrives. Then I'll be able to go with my original idea of a podcast/music/video/torrent downloader. (Again, all legal stuff.)
For those interested, I ordered a Western Digital 1 TB NAS drive and a StarTech.com drive enclosure with a built-in fan.
I already have one of those enclosures, and it works great. The fan helps keep the drive cool, and it comes with its own power adapter. Hopefully, that paired with a NAS drive designed for 24/7 operation should offer some reliable performance and a long drive life.
If anyone's interested, the enclosure I already have houses my Linux drive for my main computer. Linux being my main OS means that this drive is on for hours and hours at a time, and being written to and read from constantly. Besides a slight speed reduction due to my having USB 2 ports, I haven't had any problems running my main OS off an external HDD. That's why I ordered another one for my Pi. I just hope that the HDD I bought will work as well as the case does.
submitted by dementedsnake to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Open thread, August 2017

This is an open thread to discuss items of interest. I may also use it to drop thoughts as they occur to me as well -- something of a replacement of my former "tab closure" posts, as ... well, it seems tabs are simply running away from me. Consider this an experiment that's been mulling for some time.
If you've got a question, observation, link, or anything else, feel free to post it, with a thought to the lair rules -- like house rules, but larrier.
An evolving conversation....

Kafka as Epistemist

From "The Kafkaesque Process of Cancer Diagnosis", the concept applied here to cancer diagnosis, and in Kafka's The Trial to a process of judgement, strikes me as profoundly epistemological:
The patient continued, “You understand that the many tests and the elusive information of the recent weeks remind me of Franz Kafka's words in his famous work Der Prozess, meaning both trial and process.” “The verdict does not come suddenly, proceedings continue until a verdict is reached gradually.”

I am looking for tools to make sense of HTML DOMs

Probably in Python, though other general scripting, or possibly, compiled languages, might work. Javascript is another possibility, with a few extant tools employing this.
The primary goal is to extract document metadata (title, author, publisher, date, URL), and include the body of a document whilst excluding, or at the very least marking as secondary the ancillary bits. The though occurs that frequency / similarity analysis of the constant bits might help.
The extant tools of Readability's parser (it's survived the fall of the service), Pocket, Instapaper, Outline, etc., may be useful.
Inquiries elsewhere have also brought up Pilgrim, a project of the Knight Foundation (as Outline may also be), which isn't exactly what I'm looking for, but it's interesting in its own right.

On nuclear power and safety

There's an article making the rounds, poorly argued, IMO, extolling nuclear energy. I've been heartened by the critical response it's triggered at Hacker News, including my own contribution, previously submitted at G+ on Joerg Fliege's thread, drawing comparisons to the Banqiao Dam disaster of 1975. In part:
Proponents of nuclear power assume that we can assess risks with tails not of the decade or so of Banqiao, but of 100, 1,000, 1 million years. Utterly outside the scope of any human institutions, or of the human species itself.
Our models of risks and of costs fail us....
The problems with nuclear power are massive, long-tailed, systemic and potentially existential. The same cannot be said of a wind farm or solar array. There is no significant 10,000 year threat from wind power, or solar power. We're not risking 30 - 60 km exclusion zones, on an unplanned basis, of which we've created at least four in the half-decade of significant nuclear energy applications: Hanford, Washington, Three Mile Island, Pennsyvania, Chernobyl, Ukraine, and Fukushima, Japan. And this is with a global plant of some 450 operating nuclear power plants as of 2017....
If the total experience has been, say, 500 reactors, over 50 years, or 25,000 reactor-years of experience, and we've experienced at least four major disasters, then our failure rate is 0.016%.
The global share of nuclear power generation in 2012 was about 10%.[4] Which means that without allowing for increased electrical consumption within existing or extending to developing nations, the plant count would have to increase tenfold.
Holding the reactor-year failure rate constant would mean 80 core meltdowns per century. Reducing that to the present rate of four meltdowns/century would require reducing the failure rate to 0.0008%. That's five nines, if anyone's counting.
Five nines on a process involving weather, politics, business, social upheaval, terrorism, sabotage, individual psychology, group psychology, climate, communications, response, preparedness....

"8 Lessons from 20 years of Hype Cycles"

A look at the Gartner Hype Cycle, and lessons derived therefrom:
  1. We're terrible at making predictions. Especially about the future.
  2. An alarming number of technology trends are flashes in the pan.
  3. Lots of technologies just die. Period.
  4. The technical insight is often correct, but the implementation isn't there
  5. We've been working on a few core technical problems for decades
  6. Some technologies keep receding into the future
  7. Lots of technologies make progress when no-one is looking
  8. Many major technologies flew under the Hype Cycle radar
Michael Mullany, "8 Lessons from 20 Years of Hype Cycles".

David Gerard at the Financial Times on Bitcoin and Blockchain

David Gerard, author of Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain, interviewed by Izabella Kaminska about Bitcoin, /Buttcoin, and Tulips, among other topics. There's a bunch of great information in this podcast, of which I'll highlight two items in particular.
I've been reflecting a great deal on information, truth, and that boundary between information and belief, most principally trust. Gerard nails the value proposition of trust, and a problem with the Free All the Things trope of decentralisation:
Decentralisation is the paramount feature in bitcoin, but it turns out that that's a bad idea that's really, really expensive, because it turns out that a tiny bit of trust saves you a fortune.
"Decentralised" isn't a useful buzzword in a lot of ways, because it turns out that you want to be a part of society.
He also points at the invalidity of market capitalisation as a concept. It's an arithmetically inexpensive value to obtain (multiply total quantity by present price), but, especially in the thin markets typical of Bitcoin, it is essentially a fantasy value with no real meaning. From a conversation at The Other Place:
[C]rypto "market cap" is a meaningless number. Even on Bitcoin, the most popular one, about 100 BTC will clear the order book on any exchange. Crypto "market cap" is not a number you could realise, it's not how much money went into it, it's not anything useful. If you want to compare cryptos by interest, you'd need to measure daily trading volumes, which is a harder number to gather, and market cap doesn't turn out to be a good proxy for it. So billions of dollars in free money weren't actually just created - instead it's millions of tokens that may or may not be tradeable for ordinary bitcoins or for cash, if you don't go very fast at all.
This evokes my own explorations of cost, price, and value, and what exactly they mean.
One analogy that Gerard, Alex Kudlick, and I are leaning toward is that of electric circuits. Price is analogous to pressure, or potential (voltage). Volume would be current. This raises the question of what resistance, capacitance, and impedance would have as analogues....
FT: Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain with David Gerard (Soundcloud: 65 minutes). Highly recommended.
And you'll find Gerard on Reddit as dgerard.

Yonatan Zunger on the evolution of U.S. "court costs"

In "The history of “court costs”", Zunger writes of "a system that [you might think] has gone out of control, a mechanism that started with a good purpose that got eaten by corruption and incompetence. But you would be wrong."
In the post-Civil War South, a system came up when plantations, factories, or mines needed workers. It was based on that clever little exception in the 13th Amendment:
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Note that it doesn’t say what kind of crime you have to be convicted of.
The short of it: slavery is not illegal in the United States, just somewhat regulated.
My own main commentary ... probably worth posting in its own right, is that whilst Zunger raises excellent points about the intentionality of this system and its antecedents to Nazi Germany's concentration camps, the fact is that none of these phenomena are particularly American, nor particularly new. This isn't to excuse the United States of its guilt.
Rather: these behaviours, systems, and dynamics seem to be deeply rooted. Whether they're merely cultural (the examples I've given are all from cultural antecedants or siblings to US tradition), part of human behavioral psychology, or deeper even than that, this is not simply a matter of bad laws and bad people. Rather: It is a case of such rules and dynamics actively succeeding and crowding out alternatives.
There are two good discussions at The Other Place from the original Tootstorm and from the Medium essay.

When your political opponents are made of money ...

In politics, a growing problem is the dominance of interests who apparently have nothing but money to throw at problems
Utilising this fact in judo fashion, the thought occurs that that one possible response is to create a vast wall of problems for which they find it necessary to throw money at.
The less ease with which to discern between actual problems and fantasmic simaculra of problems, so much the better.
Have fun storming the castle!

Bill Browder: "It turned out that in Putin's Russia, there are no good guys."

At NPR: "Businessman Paints Terrifying And Complex Picture Of Putin's Russia:
In what one senator called one of the Senate Judiciary Committee's "most important" hearings, [William] Browder, a wealthy businessman-turned-activist-turned Putin-adversary shed a chilling new light on a Russian system of government that operates ruthlessly in the shadows — as Browder described it for lawmakers: a "kleptocracy" sustained by corruption, blackmail, torture and murder with Putin at its center.
"Effectively the moment that you enter into their world," Browder told senators investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, "you become theirs."
Oh, and "Russian adoptions" are one of the dog whistles for the Magnitsky Act, legislation passed in the U.S. in 2012, named after Browder's now-murdered Russian lawyer, Sergei Magnitski, imposing sanctions on human-rights violators.
Also the topic of a certain July, 2016 meeting featuring Donald Trump, Jr., and senior members of the Trump campaign, of recent memory.

The distinction isn't "online vs. offline" but "direct vs. mediated"

Articles and books on the impacts of digital and mobile media are a dime a dozen, and may be as laughable, or prophetic, as previous gerimiads on new media. "Has the Smartphone Destroyed a Generation" is fairly typical of the genre, if better than most.
Reading it, a thought recurs to me: the distinction isn't of online vs. offline, but or even screen time, but of mediated vs. direct experience.
Media mediates. It is literally that which is between the observer and the observed. And with increasingly smart media, those exchanges are very directly mediated, interposed, by third (and fourth, and fifth, and ...) parties.
This has multiple effects, a few:
I'd argue there are degrees of mediation as well. Analogue devices such as the telephone are less mediated than digital feeds such as Facebook or YouTube.
And this isn't the first period to have such experiences. I have frequent cause to point out that intellectual, academic, and creative experiences were very often epistolary, exchanges of letters. Though generally with less rapidity than today's 'round-the-world-in-a-second emails.
But that whole "online" and "cyberspace" distinction? Lose it.

The etymology of "data" ... peculiarly uninformative

I'm rather the fan of looking at etymologies of words. They often reveal interesting origins, connections, or evolutions. The etymology of data would be a peculiar exception:
1640s, classical plural of datum, from Latin datum "(thing) given," neuter past participle of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Meaning "transmittable and storable computer information" first recorded 1946. Data processing is from 1954.
By way of definitions:
a collection of facts, observations, or other information related to a particular question or problem; as, the historical data show that the budget deficit is only a small factor in determining interest rates.
Which raises the question of whether data is the collection of facts, or the symbolic or other representation of those facts.
Arising as discovered that there is a philosophy of data and I've encountered its philosopher, Brian Ballsun-Stanton (via Mastodon).

Amathia: Unteachably stupid

There are a few concepts on the harm or danger of stupidity. In "One Crucial Word", Massimo Pigliucci explores the Greek term Amathia:
Amathia. It is often translated as “ignorance,” as in the following two famous quotes from Socrates:
“Wisdom alone, is the good for man, ignorance the only evil” (Euthydemus 281d)
“There is, he said, only one good, that is, knowledge, and only one evil, that is, ignorance” (in Diogenes Laertius, II.31)
But just as in the case of other ancient Greek words (like “eudaimonia,” about which I will write later this week) the common translation hardly does the job, and indeed often leads people to misunderstand the concept and quickly dismiss it as “obviously” false, or even incoherent....
Very much worth reading. Via /Philosophy and Paul Beard.

I've made good on a year-old threat and opened up Miranda's Knitting and Tea House

Enjoy! Welcome to the Tea House: Knitting. Tea. Discussion. Intelligence. Sunshine. "We Do Things Different"tm .
This is a sibling subreddit, with more open submissions, though still in a controlled manner. More at the notice.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer on stupidity vs. evil

From The Other Place: Stupidity is a more dangerous enemy of the good than malice:
Stupidity is a more dangerous enemy of the good than malice. One may protest against evil; it can be exposed and, if need be, prevented by use of force. Evil always carries within itself the germ of its own subversion in that it leaves behind in human beings at least a sense of unease. Against stupidity we are defenseless. Neither protests nor the use of force accomplish anything here; reasons fall on deaf ears; facts that contradict one’s prejudgment simply need not be believed- in such moments the stupid person even becomes critical – and when facts are irrefutable they are just pushed aside as inconsequential, as incidental. In all this the stupid person, in contrast to the malicious one, is utterly self-satisfied and, being easily irritated, becomes dangerous by going on the attack. For that reason, greater caution is called for than with a malicious one. Never again will we try to persuade the stupid person with reasons, for it is senseless and dangerous....
Read through to the source for the full quote.
I've dug a bit deeper into the backstory. Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a contemporary and friend of Reinhold Neibur, of "Serenity Prayer" fame. He served in the Abwehr, the Nazi intelligence service, during WWII, headed by Wilhelm Canaris. Bonhoeffer and Caneris were executed by the Nazi regime on 9 April, 1945, only three weeks before the fall of Berlin and Hitler's own death. And it turns out that the Abwehr, centre of relatively unfiltered information during the regime, was an active centre of resistance to it, from within.
Bonhoeffer was one of eight children. A brother, and the husbands of two of his sisters, were also executed by the Nazi regime. Bonhoeffer's twin sister Sabine survived until 1999.
Strongly related to the previous item on amathia, and observations from Hanah Arendt.

The Edge Question, 2017

"What Scientific Term or Concept Ought to be More Widely Known?" I find The Edge to be a bit hit-or-miss, and there are some misses here. But there's a heck of a lot of hits on topics that have been floating through my brain-space, and a few names I've been following as well. David Christian ("Big History"), confirmation bias, motivated reasoning, networks, information pathology, ... Daily Nous has a promising list as well. I've got the essays lined up to ... hopefully, read. And this note as a reminder to do that.

John Stuart Mill: A Few Words on Non-Intervention

By way of Wikipedia:
There seems to be no little need that the whole doctrine of non-interference with foreign nations should be reconsidered, if it can be said to have as yet been considered as a really moral question at all... To go to war for an idea, if the war is aggressive, not defensive, is as criminal as to go to war for territory or revenue; for it is as little justifiable to force our ideas on other people, as to compel them to submit to our will in any other respect. But there assuredly are cases in which it is allowable to go to war, without having been ourselves attacked, or threatened with attack; and it is very important that nations should make up their minds in time, as to what these cases are... To suppose that the same international customs, and the same rules of international morality, can obtain between one civilized nation and another, and between civilized nations and barbarians, is a grave error...

Oil is other people's money

I was thinking through the history of the Indiana natural gas boom -- oh, yeah, what Indiana gas boom, you ask? This Indiana gas boom, lasting from about 1884 to 1903. Basically, people realised you could stick a pipe in the ground and burn what came out. Which people did. As free-standing, natural-wonder flambeaux -- flaming torches, visible for miles around. After all, such a God-given abundance would surely last forever, right?
The field burned out, literally, in two decades.
But why waste that resource? I'm thinking of a typical Analyst's Matrix, describing spending your own, vs. other people's money. Let's do that in a table:
Your money Someone else's money
Your use High quality / Low cost High quality / Cost irrelevant
Somebody else's use Quality irrelevant / Low cost Quality irrelevant / Cost irrelevant
When it comes to natural gas, or oil, or coal, the majority of the cost, that is, its initial formation is not borne by you. Only the extraction cost is. That un-borne fraction is effectively other people's money. You care about the quality of the use (its use value), but not the full formation cost.
Oil, coal, and gas, are other people's money.
The legacy of the Indiana boom lives on in a few ways. Ball Glass Company originally formed in the state to take advantage of cheap gas for glass blowing, as did numerous other manufacturing concerns. They eventually shifted to coal. And you'll find the word flambeau turning up in place-names and the odd company name to. Relics to other people's money.

Limitations on Free Speech -- revisiting "shouting 'No Fire!' in a theatre that is in fact on fire"

The dynamics since the American Fascists riots in Charlottesville, VA, and the ACLU reconsidering its position on free speech reminds me that I had started, quite uncomfortably, revisiting my own views on this about three years ago. "Shouting "No Fire" in a Warming World as a Clear and Present Danger" was my thinking at the time.
Further developments -- Charlie Hebdo attacks, "punching vs. punching down", questions over revisionist history, the amazingly good two-part YouTube set by Contrapoints: "Does the Left Hate Free Speech? (Part 1)" (video: 16:53) and "Does the Left Hate Free Speech? (Part 2)" (video: 17:46) (I'm surprised I hadn't already mentioned it), various research (Jill Gordon, "John Stuart Mill and 'The Marketplace of Ideas'" and Jill Lepore (Kansas City Public Library lecture) both address parts of this. Karl Popper's "Paradox of Tolerance". Many, many discussions, mostly on G+.
The history of free expression / free speech itself is interesting and surprising, particularly the role between Protestant and Catholic factions -- the latter being seen much the same way as Fascists are today, as constitutionally opposed to tolerance, and therefore not subject to the benefits of free speech themselves.

Jeff Schmidt on salaried professionals and the soul-battering system that shapes their lives

Disciplined Minds by physicist Jeff Schmidt has been in my files for a while. Per Unwelcomed Guests Wiki:
This book explains the social agenda of the process of professional training. Disciplined Minds shows how it is used to promote orthodoxy by detecting and weeding out dissident candidates and by exerting pressure on the rest to obey their instructors and abandon personal agendas such as social reform -- so that they, in turn, can perpetuate the system by squeezing the life out of the next generation.
This ... is strikingly similar to the critique of John Stuart Mill of England's educational systems in the 1860s. Hans Jensen addresses this in "John Stuart Mill's Theories of Wealth and Income Distribution" (available via Sci-Hub).
Several prior Reddit mentions.

So no, Sonos! Palindromic boycott of privacy-skewering IoT ToS change

Wireless, cloud-connected speaker manufacturer Sonos have retroactively changed terms of service and required existing product owners monitoring subjects accept the new terms or the devices will cease to function.
And this, boys and girls, is why you don't buy Sonos products, ever.
(Or any Internet of Things that Spy On You devices.)
Palindrome courtesey Sakari Maaranen.

Alexander Hamilton Church and cost accounting: Capital-Labour analysis

Alexander Hamilton Church (28 May 1866 – 11 February 1936) was an English efficiency engineer, accountant and writer on accountancy and management, known for his seminal work of management and cost accounting. In particular, it was his work which expanded the concept of factors of production from just labour to include capital and other inputs.
Among his works, Production factors in cost accounting and works management (1910), from whose introduction:
From the earliest days of manufacturing there has grown up a custom of considering labor as the main and only direct item in production, and of expressing all other expenditure in more or less vague percentages of wage cost. The fact is, however, that labor, while always important, tends to become less important relatively to other items as the progress of organized manufacture develops and the use of specialized and expensive mechanical equipment increases. Very few concerns have come to grief by ignoring labor costs, but many have passed into the hands of receivers by ignoring the relative imiportance of the other factors of production.

On social media and online tools as "optional": Facebook required for AirBnB

Via The Guardian, "I didn’t have enough Facebook friends to prove to Airbnb I was real":
At the other end of the Airbnb helpline in Colorado, “Casey” sounded incredulous. “You have how many Facebook friends?” she drawled. “Er … about 50,” I replied. Long pause. “Well, you don’t have enough for us to verify you. You’d need at least 100.”
“But”, I squeaked, “I post every now and again … I’m on Facebook most days to check on my friends and relations.” This, however, was not enough to convince Airbnb I existed. And, as I didn’t exist, I could not book a room.
Keep this in mind next time someone declares "nobody forces you to use Facebook". Despite the many other refutations of this trope, we can now respond unequivocally: "AirBnB do".

Milestones: the 900 club

Just to memorialise this, and to bury the item as I close out this thread: the Dreddit has crossed the 900 subscriber threshold for the first time. Thanks to all, again, I will strive to be worth your time. It's interesting how much I prefer not to note such things, and yet do in fact note them. The days of teetering just on the edge in particular.

Previously:

One last thing ...

Do you like what you're reading here? Would you like to see a broader discussion? Do you think there are ideas which should be shared more broadly?
The Lair isn't a numbers game, my real goal is quality -- reaching, and hopefully interacting with, an intelligent online community. Something which I've found, in several decades of online interactions, difficult to achieve.
But there's something which works surprisingly well: word of mouth. Shares, by others, to appropriate venues, have generated the best interactions. I do some of that, but I could use your help as well.
So: if you see something that strikes you as particularly cogent (or, perhaps, insipid), please share it. To another subreddit. To Twitter or Facebook or G+. To the small-but-high-quality Metafilter. To your blogging circle, or a mailing list. If you work in technology, or policy, or economics, there as well.
Thanks, Morbius.
submitted by dredmorbius to dredmorbius [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Protocol: Proof of Work shown in Python Code Building your own cryptocurrency trading bot using Python and the Poloniex API, Part 2 Bitcoin Price Chart with Python - Part 1 Constructing a Bitcoin transaction using python - 2/5 Get Started with Python Bitcoin Program : Programming ...

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Bitcoin Protocol: Proof of Work shown in Python Code

Bitcoin Protocol Paper Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UieiMU-ImvI&list=PLQVvvaa0QuDcq2QME4pfeh0cE71mkb_qz&feature=share All Bitcoin Videos Playlist... Brian walks you through a simple cryptocurrency trading bot in Python and using the Poloniex API. Part 1 of this series can be found here: https://youtu.be/f... My Book: https://www.amazon.com/Building-Bitcoin-Websites-Beginners-Development/dp/153494544X A simple introduction tutorial to get started with the pybitcoi... This video is for people who wants to use (almost) raw python code to create a private and a public Bitcoin keys and to convert them to Bitcoin address. In this video I'm using the external ... This video is for people who want to use (almost) raw python code to Constructing a Bitcoin transaction. In the previous videos, I've explained how to connect to the bitcoin network, as well as ...

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